Report shows US deficit to exceed $1 trillion next year

Trump has vowed to balance the budget and pay down the entire national debt.

By Kevin Freking / Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The federal budget deficit is expected to balloon to more than $1 trillion in the next fiscal year under the first projections taking into account the big budget deal that President Donald Trump and Congress reached this summer, the Congressional Budget Office reported Wednesday.

The return of $1 trillion annual deficits comes despite Trump’s vow when running for office that he would not just balance the budget but pay down the entire national debt.

“The nation’s fiscal outlook is challenging,” said Phillip Swagel, director of the nonpartisan CBO. “Federal debt, which is already high by historical standards, is on an unsustainable course.”

The office upped this year’s deficit projection by $63 billion and the cumulative deficit projection for the next decade by $809 billion. The higher deficit projections come even as the CBO reduced its estimate for interest rates, which lowers borrowing costs, and as it raised projections for economic growth in the near term.

The number crunchers at CBO projected that the deficit for the current fiscal year will come to $960 billion. In the next fiscal year, which begins Oct 1, it will exceed $1 trillion.

The CBO said the budget deal signed into law earlier this month, which took away the prospect of a government shutdown in October and the threat of deep automatic spending cuts, would boost deficits by $1.7 trillion over the coming decade. Increased spending on disaster relief and border security would add $255 billion. Downward revisions to the forecast for interest rates will help the picture, trimming $1.4 trillion.

Swagel said the federal debt will rise even higher after the coming decade because of the nation’s aging population and higher spending on health care.

To put the country on sustainable footing, Swagel said, lawmakers will have to increase taxes, cut spending or combine the two approaches.

The CBO’s estimate is the first to reflect the hard-won budget and debt deal signed into law earlier this month.

“The recent budget deal was a budget buster, and now we have further proof. Both parties took an already unsustainable situation and made it much worse,” said Maya MacGuineas, president of the private Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

MacGuineas said lawmakers should ensure the legislation they enact is paid for and redouble efforts to control the growth in health care costs and restore the solvency of the Social Security program. Her organization is focused on educating the public on issues with significant fiscal policy impact.

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

Snohomish County manufacturers sew 27,000 masks for nurses

Two Mukilteo businesses, and others around the county, have shifted their focus to fight COVID-19.

Most building sites have shut down, but there are exceptions

The state Senate Republican Caucus has asked Gov. Jay Inslee to lift the ban on residential work.

During this outbreak, let’s be warriors

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, it’s time for a renewed focus on making a difference.

Trump uses wartime act but GM, Ventec are already moving fast

The carmaker is working with the Bothell company to produce up to 10,000 ventilators per month.

Comments welcome on the proposed Lake Stevens Costco

The company’s permit to fill wetlands is under review. Public comment is open until April 12.

Trump stops deal for Bothell’s Ventec to produce ventilators

The project would have had the company producing more than 1,000 ventilators a month.

As Boeing shuts down, an employee’s family is left to grieve

To his family, Elton Washington is much more than a statistic in the growing COVID-19 pandemic.

Paine Field passenger volume plummets; flight changes likely

Despite a 68% drop, the passenger terminal’s owner expects to weather the coronavirus crisis.

Inslee signs the law repealing a Boeing tax break

The move, which the aerospace giant sought, aims to resolve an international trade dispute.

Inslee signs law allowing sharing of sales tax with tribes

It also helps end a legal fight over taxes involving the county, the state and the Tulalip Tribes.

Boeing plants here to close; infected Everett worker dies

To the relief of anxious employees, the company said it will shut down factory operations for two weeks.

Not everything is closed as businesses evolve to stay alive

Places are offering curbside pick-up and online orders and are banding together to draw wary customers.