Loyola Marymount University finance student Maliek Reed, 19, is a sneaker fan who doesn’t like the rising prices generated by popular sneaker resale websites such as StockX. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Loyola Marymount University finance student Maliek Reed, 19, is a sneaker fan who doesn’t like the rising prices generated by popular sneaker resale websites such as StockX. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Sneakers are now assets trading like stocks

The multibillion-dollar worldwide sneaker resale market is looking more like an occupation.

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