South Carolina Department of Corrections Director Bryan Stirling shows a monitor with images taken by a drone in Columbia, South Carolina, on Thursday. The drones will be used to monitor safety and contraband smuggling at state prisons. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)

South Carolina Department of Corrections Director Bryan Stirling shows a monitor with images taken by a drone in Columbia, South Carolina, on Thursday. The drones will be used to monitor safety and contraband smuggling at state prisons. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)

South Carolina plans to use drones to remotely watch inmates

“I think you’re seeing the future of corrections, right here.”

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