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2022 in a glance: The 10 most loved food stories

News of food trucks, a pie serving dive bar and baked beans were some of The Herald’s top food stories

In 2022, The Herald highlighted restaurants and events, both new and old, that sparked joy in our community through food. Here are the stories Snohomish County foodies were hungry for this year:

The 9th-annual Everett Food Truck Festival was held Aug. 13. (Jake Campbell / Everett Food Truck Festival)

The 9th-annual Everett Food Truck Festival was held Aug. 13. (Jake Campbell / Everett Food Truck Festival)

10. Your ultimate guide to this weekend’s Everett Food Truck Festival (Aug. 9)

Downtown Everett hosted its 9th annual Everett Food Truck Festival this past August, which showcased 20 food trucks. Along with food, festival-goers could enjoy drinks from over 20 craft breweries and cideries across the Northwest, live music, and shopping from over 30 local artists. This was the second year the Everett Food Truck Festival partnered with the Upper Left Beerfest. “The partnership allows more options for more people, making it more of a delicious win-win and that much more of a fun day in downtown Everett for everyone,” said Garret Hunt, organizer of the Everett Food Truck Festival and Live in Everett’s co-founder, in a press release.

Jeff Knoch, owner of Jeff’s Texas Style BBQ, pours brisket into his signature brisket baked beans on Jan. 13, in Marysville. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Jeff Knoch, owner of Jeff’s Texas Style BBQ, pours brisket into his signature brisket baked beans on Jan. 13, in Marysville. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

9. Baked beans like no other — and you can make them at home (May 17)

Jeff Knoch, owner of Marysville BBQ spot Jeff’s Texas Style BBQ, shared the recipe for his famous baked beans. Baked beans are the restaurant’s top-selling side dish, beating out their creamy mac and cheese. Customers ask Knoch for the recipe so often that he now has printed copies. He uses the central Texas method, developed by butchers trying to make unsellable cuts more appealing. “Carrying on a tradition that’s been around for over 100 years is amazing,” Knoch said.

Tomato is charred by Joel Childs at The Chef Behind The Curtain, in Snohomish. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Tomato is charred by Joel Childs at The Chef Behind The Curtain, in Snohomish. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

8. This tiny Snohomish restaurant is a best-kept secret among locals (July 5)

The Chef Behind the Curtain combines Joel Childs’ love of Pacific Northwest ingredients with European culinary influences. However, it is easy to miss this fine dining experience, as no signs mark the downtown Snohomish location. “Your moment here, from the beginning to the end, should be something special,” co-owner Bex Woolman said. “That connection, of what food and beverage can do in the way it brings people to a better place, that’s what’s so special.” For $55 guests can enjoy an appetizer, entrée, and dessert. The restaurant opened in February 2021. Holding only 10 seats, the tiny venue served as a calming respite from the pandemic. It has maintained that relaxed intimacy ever since. “If you don’t want to be in a rush, we’re the best place for you,” Childs said.

The Hotlapeno sandwich has Sweet Radish’s hand-breaded chicken, pickled jalapenos, cabbage slaw, fiery Seoul sauce and honey mayo. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

The Hotlapeno sandwich has Sweet Radish’s hand-breaded chicken, pickled jalapenos, cabbage slaw, fiery Seoul sauce and honey mayo. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

7. Sweet Radish is Everett’s favorite new chicken shop (Jun. 21)

Sweet Radish offers perfectly fried chicken you can enjoy during a quick lunch stop or family dinner. The chicken-forward restaurant was formally known as 9 Delicacies, a Korean fusion restaurant, before owner Diane Kim rebranded during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the food comes out quick, Sweet Radish is not fast food. The chicken is fresh and sauces are made in house. There may not be any Korean dishes on the menu, but Kim’s Korean roots can be tasted throughout the menu. Kim’s main goal is to make delicious food at a fare price. “I want to serve everyday people,” Kim said. “Sometimes we have difficulties in our lives, but we still want to eat out.”

The queso birria tacos at El Mariachi call for slow cooked brisket, melty cheese sandwiched between two corn tortillas, a shower of cilantro and bright pink pickled onions, and a bowl of consomé. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

The queso birria tacos at El Mariachi call for slow cooked brisket, melty cheese sandwiched between two corn tortillas, a shower of cilantro and bright pink pickled onions, and a bowl of consomé. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

6. El Mariachi opens Everett restaurant, promising everlasting birria tacos (Sep. 13)

Former food truck El Mariachi opened a new, permanent home on Evergreen Way in September. The restaurant is known for its birra tacos, but don’t overlook their birria raman, horchata or tortas. Chef and co-owner Hugo Carranza is excited to share his love for food and grow in this new location. “In Mexican culture, birria is a really special dish,” Carranza said. “Every quinceañera, every wedding has them. It’s a special dish that we get to serve every day.”

Emory’s restaurant on Silver Lake in Everett. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

Emory’s restaurant on Silver Lake in Everett. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

5. ‘End of an era’: Emory’s restaurant sold; Anthony’s taking over (Feb. 24)

After almost thirty years, iconic Everett restaurant Emory’s closed its doors. However, another Pacific Northwest mainstay opened a new concept early March. Owners Molly and Emory Cole called the restaurant’s closing the “end of an era”. They sold the eatery to Anthony’s Restaurants, a family-owned seafood chain with more than 30 locations throughout Washington, Oregon and Idaho. The Cole’s the new owner to be a family-owned, local establishment and Anthony’s checked these boxes. “It’s exciting to move on to a different chapter at this point,” Emory Cole said. “My wife Molly and I are looking forward to some ‘us’ time.”

Eleven-year-old Gabe Fitzpatrick serves ice cream out of his parents’ Yay Big Yay High Yay Ice Cream Truck on May 14, outside Eisenhower Middle School in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Eleven-year-old Gabe Fitzpatrick serves ice cream out of his parents’ Yay Big Yay High Yay Ice Cream Truck on May 14, outside Eisenhower Middle School in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

4. Your guide to Everett’s food truck bonanza at Fisherman’s Village (May 19)

Thirteen food trucks lined the streets of downtown Everett during the Night Market at Fisherman’s Village this past May. The festival was free to enter and featured over 40 artisan vendors at the Everett Makers Market, along with live music from local artists, a beer garden and food truck galore. Festival-goers could chose from BBQ, German, boba, donuts, poke and more.

Enseamada, a new Filipino cafe in Everett, serves up generous plates like their adobo bowl, with soy garlic chicken, mac salad, rice and dressed lettuce. They also offer coffee drinks, halo halo and their must-have ensaymadas. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

Enseamada, a new Filipino cafe in Everett, serves up generous plates like their adobo bowl, with soy garlic chicken, mac salad, rice and dressed lettuce. They also offer coffee drinks, halo halo and their must-have ensaymadas. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

3. Everett pie shop, Filipino cafe, Sonic Drive-In: See what’s new in Snohomish County’s dining scene (Aug. 23)

Nuggets, The Herald’s restaurant news column, highlights big changes impacting Snohomish County foodies. August’s installment of Nuggets included a new Filipino spot, an upcoming Sonic location and an update on what will update the former Casa Tequila restaurant. Starting as a pop-up business in Seattle, Enseamada moved to their new cafe space in July where they offer fast-casual Filipino food. Pisces Pies Baking Company also opened new retail location in Snohomish County. Owner Angela Freese started her business in 2019 and was excited to finally open a physical store front. And Washington Burrito took over Casa Tequila’s former location where they also serve Mexican food, but also offer vegetarian and vegan options.

The newly opened Pie Dive Bar in May 17, in Snohomish. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

The newly opened Pie Dive Bar in May 17, in Snohomish. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

2. Pie Dive Bar opens in Snohomish. Yep, it’s exactly how it sounds. (May 24)

Belly up to Pie Dive Bar in downtown Snohomish if you’re in the mood for a stiff drink and a slice of award winning pie. Alyssa and Hart Kingsbery opened the Twin Peaks themed dive bar and bakery in early May. If you don’t want booze with your pie, the bar offers non-alcoholic drinks at $3.14 a pop. The Kingsbery business offers both savory and sweet pies, as well as quiche for their weekend brunch menu. Pie Dive Bar is not Alyssa’s first pie business venture: She’s open and sold, Seattle Pie Company, The Pie Lady and Pie Wine Bar. “This is my mastery of all the pie bars I’ve built,” she said. “It’s a place for everybody. Blue collared guys, people on a date. It’s a melting pot.”

Downtown Edmonds is a dining destination, boasting fresh seafood, Caribbean-inspired sandwiches, artisan bread and more. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

Downtown Edmonds is a dining destination, boasting fresh seafood, Caribbean-inspired sandwiches, artisan bread and more. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)

1. This idyllic dining destination is right in Snohomish County (Dec. 1)

Downtown Edmonds is a foodies haven. Food reporter Taylor Goebel compiled a list of her favorite eats (and drinks) while exploring the town. First stop is The Cottage, Community Bakery (if you can make it before they sell out) which provides the community with baked goods using fresh, seasonal ingredients and locally milled Washington-grain flour. For lunch head to Caribbean-inspired alehouse, Maize & Barley, for a quick sandwich. For a pre-dinner snack, you can stop by Market Edmonds and try the Dungeness crab donut. If you’re in the mood for surf and turf, Salt & Iron is your final dinner stop. The Edmonds steakhouse offers everything from buttery bone marrow to Spanish octopus.

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