Tokuji Miyasaka, an 11-year-old violinist, will be the featured soloist at the Cascade Symphony Orchestra’s annual children’s “Tubby the Tuba” concert Feb. 9 at the Edmonds Center for the Arts. (Cascade Symphony Orchestra)

Tokuji Miyasaka, an 11-year-old violinist, will be the featured soloist at the Cascade Symphony Orchestra’s annual children’s “Tubby the Tuba” concert Feb. 9 at the Edmonds Center for the Arts. (Cascade Symphony Orchestra)

11-year-old violinist to solo with Cascade Symphony Orchestra

Saturday’s children’s concert will include “Tubby the Tuba” featuring a tuba solo and narrated story.

Tokuji Miyasaka, winner of the 2018-19 Rising Star competition, is the featured violin soloist for Cascade Symphony Orchestra’s next concert, which has been postponed due to snow.

The 11-year-old will perform the first movement and cadenza of Mozart’s “Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major, K. 216” with the orchestra March 31 at the Edmonds Center for the Arts.

“It’s light and joyous,” said Tokuji of his solo.

The Rising Star competition, which was founded in 2009, recognizes youth of unusual talent. In turn, the Cascade Symphony’s annual children’s concert gives those Rising Star musicians a solo.

Tokuji, a sixth-grade student who is homeschooled, made his orchestra debut with the Spokane Symphony in 2018. Since then, his violin has taken him to Alaska, Indiana, Minnesota and the Czech Republic.

He has won first prize at the Great Composers Competition: Music of Eastern Europe, the Adjudicators Choice Gold Medal at Musicfest Northwest and an outstanding achievement award at the Seattle Young Artists Music Festival.

Saturday’s concert will include performances by the Cascade Percussion Ensemble and “Tubby the Tuba,” with David Brewer on tuba and narrated by Seattle radio personality Dave Dolacky.

“Tubby the Tuba,” written by Paul Tripp and George Kleinsinger in 1945, was added to Library of Congress’ National Recording Registry as one of the landmarks in American audio history in 2006.

Everett Philharmonic

In the mood for a Mozart history lesson?

Everett Philharmonic Orchestra’s “That Magnificent Mozart!” concert at 3 p.m. Feb. 10 at First Presbyterian Church, 2936 Rockefeller Ave., Everett, will include excerpts from Mozart’s earliest works.

The program, featuring baritone Ryan Bede from the Seattle Opera, also will include one of Mozart’s first symphonic masterpieces.

The concert will begin with “Abduction from the Sergalio,” an overture inspired by Turkish music. The piece, which premiered in 1782, features unusual instruments at the time — a piccolo (half-size flute), cymbals, triangles and big Turkish drums.

“This opera was the first that Mozart wrote that got him success,” conductor Paul-Elliot Cobbs said.

The orchestra will follow the overture with excerpts from “The Marriage of Figaro, K. 492,” an opera told in four acts.

“Symphony No. 29 in A Major,” composed by Mozart when he was 18 in 1774, will cap the evening.

Tickets are $25 general, $20 seniors and military, $10 students with ID. Children 12 or younger get in free. Call 206-270-9729 or go to www.everettphil.org for more information.

Evan Thompson: 425-339-3427, ethompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @ByEvanThompson.

If you go

Cascade Symphony Orchestra’s children’s concert is 3 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Edmonds Center for the Arts, 410 Fourth Ave. N., Edmonds.

Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for students with ID and $3 for youth. Call 425-275-9595. More at www.cascadesymphony.org.

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