19th century memorabilia honored Father of Our Country

This is a George Washington doll made of painted cloth. The face and clothing are familiar and he really did have blue eyes. It recently sold for $3,080.

This is a George Washington doll made of painted cloth. The face and clothing are familiar and he really did have blue eyes. It recently sold for $3,080.

While Valentine’s Day is always Feb. 14, President’s Day can be any one of seven dates, the third Monday in February closest to the 20th.

In 1885 George Washington’s birthday, Feb. 22, was made a national holiday. But in 1971, Congress decided that instead of celebrating the real birthdays of President Washington and President Lincoln (Feb. 12), there would a Monday celebration for both.

Why Monday? To give everyone a three-day weekend away from work. Feb. 20 was chosen because it was between the two real birthdays.

President Washington lived in the days before cameras, so he was remembered in designs for silhouettes, paintings, prints, medals, cameos, glass patterns, toys, Staffordshire figures to keep on the mantel and even drapery fabrics. Most of the memorabilia was copied from the few famous paintings of the president images that still are used.

A President Washington doll made after 1880 looks like Washington in his presidential years. The doll is made of cloth with pressed and oil-painted features, and gray hair worn in a ponytail. His eyes are blue. The doll is dressed in a silk suit with a lace jabot and wears a tri-corn hat, black stockings and shoes with buckles. The costume is a familiar one. The doll probably was not made for a young child, but as a part of the 1889 centennial celebration of Washington’s inauguration. It was made by Martha Jenks Chase who started making portrait dolls in her backyard about 1880. A 25-inch tall Chase Washington doll sold at a May 14, 2016, Theriault’s auction in Las Vegas for $3,080.

Q: In 1963 my uncle, who worked for Marshall Field’s in Chicago, gave me a platter that was used in one of the store’s dining rooms. It’s 16½ inches long and 12½ inches wide, and is marked “Bramble” and “Wedgwood.” It’s cream-colored with a border of flowers and thorns in shades of white, pale pink and garnet. Is it worth anything? It has great sentimental value to me.

A: Josiah Wedgwood established his pottery in England in 1759. Wedgwood is still in business, now part of Fiskars Group. Bramble pattern was introduced in 1963. The briar rose design was made in several colors and was one of Wedgwood’s popular patterns. Platters were made in different shapes and sizes. The value of your platter is about $70.

Q: I have a plate with crown mark above the words “Sanderlands &Colley Ltd. England” in a circle. I’ve searched the internet, but I didn’t find any item with the same name or mark. Can you tell me something about this company and how old this plate is?

A: The mark is probably Sandlands &Colley Ltd., not Sanderlands &Colley. The company operated Lichfield Pottery in Hanley, Staffordshire, England, from 1907 to 1910. The mark may have been used after that to about 1913 by W. Sandland. Pieces made by Sandlands &Colley occasionally show up online. The monetary value depends on the item’s decorative value.

Q: I found an old weather-beaten trunk with wood slats on a flat top and metal corners. It has a metal lock with the name E.A. Seagrove. It appears to be some sort of navy officer’s box. The trunk is missing a corner piece and the top is warped. Does it have any value? Should I pay to restore it?

A: E.A. Seagrove was a naval outfitter in business in Portsea, Portsmouth, England. The company made brass bound chests and other items. The family business started in 1795 when Edwin’s father, William, who had a textile and drapery business near the dockyards in Portsea, began supplying naval officers with equipment and furniture. The name of the company changed several times as his sons and other members of the Seagrove family joined the business. The name of the business was E.A. Seagrove from 1866 to 1892, when it became Seagrove &Co. If you want to use it, ask a restorer what it would cost to put it in shape. Then decide if it can be restored. It has almost no antique value.

Q: I’d like information about my great-grandmother’s full set of beautiful dishes and serving bowls given to her as a wedding gift in 1876. They are marked “LS &S Carlsbad Austria.”

A: This mark was used about 1895 to 1917 by Lewis Straus &Sons, importers located in New York City. Carlsbad was part of Austria until after World War I, when it became part of Czechoslovakia. Today the town is called Karlovy Vary and is part of the Czech Republic. Several factories in Austria, Bavaria, and Germany used “Carlsbad” in their mark. Many pieces were exported to the United States in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Sets of china are hard to sell, but you can enjoy the dishes for their sentimental value.

Q: What’s the current value of a 1920s Master Prophylactic coin-operated dispenser in excellent condition, with keys? It was manufactured by the Norris Co. in Chicago.

A: Norris Manufacturing Co. made the Master Prophylactic dispenser beginning in 1920.

The company made at least 30 different vending machines and arcade games in the 1920s and 1930s. The Master Prophylactic dispenser is cast iron and was made to be mounted on the wall in the men’s room. There are collectors of this type of machine as well as many other more decorative types. A few have sold at auction for over $1,000.

Terry Kovel and Kim Kovel answer questions sent to the column. By sending a letter with a question and a picture, you give full permission for use in the column or any other Kovel forum. Names, addresses or email addresses will not be published. We cannot guarantee the return of photographs, but if a stamped envelope is included, we will try. The amount of mail makes personal answers or appraisals impossible. Write to Kovels, King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St., New York, NY 10019.

Current prices

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.

Depression glass, sugar, cherry blossom pattern, pink, embossed flowers, angular handles, scalloped rim, c. 1935, 3 x 5½ inches, $20.

Valentine card, embossed paper lace cover, homeycomb medallion, pink tissue, girl and dog, signed, G Fox Story, c.1860, 4 x 3 inches, $95.

Silver Plate grapefruit holder, scroll openwork petals, domed saucer foot, crown mark, Rockport Co., 1940s, $130.

Fortune Telling Cards, tarot, gold edges, text and images, The Nile, US Playing Card Co., box, 52-card deck, c. 1900, 4 x 3 inches, $145.

Vacuum Cleaner, pneumatic, steel, tin, brass and wood, cylindrical, spool shape handle, Reeves Co., 1915, 49 x 8 inches, $210.

Bronze doorknocker, Abraham Lincoln, profile, slavery abolished speech text, round, ring striker, 1915, 3 ½ x 3 inches, $300.

Basket, messenger pigeon carrier, wicker, woven, lift lid, top door opening, window cutouts, leather strap closure, c. 1910, 13 x 23 inches, $450.

Table, candle, pewter and cast iron, gold and cream, offering slot, embossed flowers, lower shelf, candle holders, 1920s, 19 x 57 inches, $795.

Sterling-silver bottle opener, corkscrew, mermaid and fish shaped, ruby eye, G.W. Lewis, box set, 1938, each 4 inches, $955.

Carnival gambling wheel, wooden framed bicycle tire, pinned-on playing cards, mounted to plank, hanging, 1930s, 31-inch diameter, $1,300.

Talk to us

More in Life

Vegetable seeds need good drainage in the pots or flats they start in. Too much or too little moisture will both spell disaster. (Getty Images)
If starting plants from seed, don’t forget to read the packet

Follow these tips, plus the guidelines you’ve already read on that package, and you should do just fine.

This Yellow Coach bus made by Arcade is 13 inches long and in great condition. It sold for $600 at Bertoia Auctions in 2020. (Cowles Syndicate Inc.)
This Arcade yellow double decker bus was made about 1926

In 1921, Arcade Manufacturing Co. decided to make toys that were copies of real vehicles and everyday items.

Common snowdrops are long lived and lend themselves to dividing and naturalizing in the landscape. (Richie Steffen)
Great Plant Pick: Galanthus nivalis aka common snowdrops

Once established, the bulbs are long lived and lend themselves to dividing and naturalizing in the landscape.

"Man and Wife" by Ula Nero
Polish emigrant in Mukilteo shares her colorful artistic vision

Ula Nero is inspired by the Expressionism and Fauvism movements to create funky pet portraits, and much more.

Metal scuptor Wayne Kangas made this fish-shaped weather vane out of 600 leftover stainless steel letters. (Langley Arts Fund)
This artful flying fish tells the weather in Langley

The Langley Arts Fund commissioned “Weather Vane II” by Wayne Kangas for public art in Clyde Alley.

Matt and Jill Wurst opened Audacity Brewing in December 2020 and are now managing to stay open, with the COVID-19 restrictions on businesses, at their brewery on 10th Street on Monday, Jan. 11, 2020 in Snohomish, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
It took some Audacity to open this new Snohomish brewery

The COVID-19 pandemic hit just as Matt and Jill Wurst were getting the business off the ground.

Carissa Hudson pulls a beer at Engel's Pub in Edmonds. At 86 years old, Engel's is one of the oldest bars in Snohomish County.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
When it’s finally safe, these dive bars are worth checking out

David Blend called the watering holes “an essential part of the American experience” in an ode to the haunts.

Enjoy stuffed mini bell peppers on Game Day. (Tulalip Resort Casino)
Make Tulalip chef’s stuffed mini bell peppers for game day

These one-bite treats can be prepped the night before, then popped into the oven for 10 minutes on Super Sunday.

Meatballs go hand-in-hand with spaghetti, but they also can add a wonderful flavor and texture to soup. Pair them with cheese tortellini and youêve got an amped-up version of Italian wedding soup. (Gretchen McKay/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette/MCT)
Not just for spaghetti: Add meatballs to your winter soup

Make an amped-up version of Italian wedding soup with turkey meatballs and cheese tortellini.

Most Read