Book-related events in Snohomish County.

Book-related events in Snohomish County.

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

  • Sunday, July 12, 2020 1:30am
  • Life

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Noelle Salazar: 5 p.m. July 16, Edmonds Bookshop, 111 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds. One fateful day, Audrey Coltrane gets caught in the air over Pearl Harbor just as the bombs begin to fall. Suddenly, nowhere feels safe. In the novel “The Flight Girls,” Audrey joins the Women Airforce Service Pilots in 1941. The bonds she forms with her fellow pilots reignite a spark of hope in the face of war, and give her the strength to cross the front lines and fight for everything she holds dear. This is the Bothell author’s first novel. More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

J.G. Knott: 2 p.m. July 18, Neverending Bookshop, 7530 Olympic View Drive, Suite 105, Edmonds. In the historical novel “Beyond the Gates Of Ani,” Knott presents a tale of old Armenia from 1064 to the end of the first Crusade. It is a historical novel of adventure, friendship and love, set against the political intrigue of the Byzantine Empire in the 11th century. The author is an avid traveler and reader of historical fiction. He also published “Beyond the Bitter Sea” in 2014. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Michael Shurgot: 2 p.m. Aug. 8, Neverending Bookshop, 7530 Olympic View Drive, Suite 105, Edmonds. With his book “Green River Saga,” co-written by Rick O’Shea, the novel takes place in 1866 and tells the story of a band of Southern Cheyenne and Green River ranchers working to settle a land dispute before actions turn violent. Shurgot is a retired humanities professor from South Puget Sound Community College in Olympia. He also is the author of “Shakespeare’s Sense of Character,” “Stages of Play” and “Could You Be Startin’ from Somewhere Else?” More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Wendy Kendall: 2 p.m. Aug. 22, Neverending Bookshop, 7530 Olympic View Drive, Suite 105, Edmonds. Kendall’s “Kat out of the Bag” introduces Katherine Watson, international purse designer and unintentional sleuth. While at a gala to showcase her bags, a body is discovered. This is the first book in Kendall’s “In Purse-Suit Mystery Series.” Kendall is a freelancer writer and editor from Edmonds. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Maria Kliavkoff: 6 p.m. Aug. 30, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. Most of us were never taught how to grieve properly. We were told “just keep busy” and “time heals all wounds.” As a result, we find ourselves alone, trapped in our grief. In “Healthy Mourning, Happy Loving,” Kliavkoff offers practical ways to use our daily experience as a pathway to authentic mourning. While serving as the executive director of the Hospice Society of the Columbia Valley, Kliavkoff earned her death and grief studies certificate from the Center for Loss and Life Transition. More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

NEW BOOKS

William McClain: The Lynnwood author’s first book,“The Risk in Crossing Borders,” will be published in July. The book follows 54-year-old Yana Pickering as she crosses new borders — at home in Seattle and nearly 7,000 miles away in Syria. McClain taught math and physics in high school for 10 years and worked as a consultant on company retirement plans for 30 years.

Robert Graef: The Lake Stevens writer ventures into fiction with “Teachable Moments.” Now finding favor with local book clubs, the novel is set in school districts in the Stillaguamish estuary in the 1990s — though plot elements were drawn from actual happenings through the 1980s and ’90s. Graef wrote the book to generate a more sympathetic view of challenges inherent in properly managing public schools.

Bill Witthuhn: A former teacher and coach in Snohomish, Witthuhn has written a book. “The Contest” is the tale of a business with fading sales that sponsors a contest to get back into the black. Surprises and challenges are expected with any competition, but no one could ever predict it would lead to a school shooting. You can find Witthuhn’s self-published novel on Amazon.

Steve K. Bertrand: The Mukilteo author has released another book of poetry: “Primitive Places: Collected Haiku” is a collection of 1,000 haiku about life in the Pacific Northwest. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 29 books. Find them on Amazon.

POETRY READINGS

Cafe Zippy: 7 p.m. Thursdays. Everett Poetry Night at the cafe is on most Thursday evenings at 1502 Rucker Ave., Everett. Call 425-303-0474.

Hibulb Cultural Center: 6 p.m. first Thursdays. The museum’s Open Mic Poetry series continues. In the Longhouse Room at 6410 23rd Ave. NE, Tulalip. Visit www.hibulbculturalcenter.org for more.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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