Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Sunday, September 27, 2020 1:30am
  • Life

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Events may be canceled or postponed. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Write on the Sound: The Write on the Sound writer’s conference, scheduled for Oct. 1-4, will be held online this year. There are 24 workshops and panel discussions on the craft of writing for all levels and interests, including information regarding today’s writing and publishing industry. Registration deadline is Sept. 30, unless sessions sell out. Find a list of presentations and speakers’ biographies, as well as registration and fees information, at www.writeonthesound.com.

Kolbie Blume: Everett Public Library presents this live-streaming author event 4 p.m. Oct. 8. Blume’s book, “Wilderness Watercolor Landscapes,” includes 30 step-by-step projects anyone can accomplish. Blume will host a painting workshop in which she guides you through a complete project. No art supplies? A limited number of kits will be available for pick up at the library on Sept. 28. Registration is required. A link to the presentation will be emailed after registration. Call 425-257-8000. More at www.epls.org.

Sharon Lynn Fisher: The Neverending Bookshop presents this live-streaming author event 7 p.m. Oct. 13 via Zoom. Fisher’s “The Raven Lady” is the latest book in her Faery Rehistory series. Duncan O’Malley — who shares his body with King Finvara — and the Elven princess Koli as they navigate old hate and the potential for new love. Fisher also is the author of “The Absinthe Earl,” “Ghost Planet” and “The Ophelia Prophecy.” Email theneverendingbookshop@gmail.com to get the Zoom link. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Neal Karlen: Everett Public Library presents this live-streaming author event 6 p.m. Oct. 15. Prince remains one of the most mysterious rock icons of all time. In his book, “This Thing Called Life: Prince’s Odyssey, On and Off the Record,” Karlen explores his decades-long relationship with Prince. He was the only journalist Prince granted in-depth press interviews to for over a dozen years. Karlen will be joined by 107.7 The End radio personality Gregr. Registration is required. A link to the presentation will be emailed after registration. Call 425-257-8000. More at www.epls.org.

NEW BOOKS

Toni Kief: The Marysville author’s latest novel, “Saints, Strangers and Rosehip Tea,” is about Kief’s ancestor who was on a passenger on the Mayflower. Susanna Jackson was just a girl from Scrooby, in north Nottinghamshire, England. When her father became involved in the Separatist Protestant movement, his faith and commitment led her to board the Mayflower to Plymouth, Massachusetts. Kief, a member of Writers Cooperative of the Pacific Northwest, also is the author of the “Mildred Unchained” series and “Dare to Write in a Flash.”

Conrad Jungmann Jr.: The Lynnwood resident is the author of the mystery thriller “Edge of Redfish Lake.” It’s 1988. A murderer lurks in the salmon fisheries of Alaska. As journalist Julian Hopkins tries to make sense out of his best friend’s drowning, he finds out that the fatally beautiful Bristol Bay is also the lair of a serial killer. This is Jungmann’s debut novel and first feature screenplay.

William McClain: The Lynnwood author’s first book is “The Risk in Crossing Borders.” The book follows 54-year-old Yana Pickering as she crosses new borders — at home in Seattle and nearly 7,000 miles away in Syria. McClain taught math and physics in high school for 10 years and worked as a consultant on company retirement plans for 30 years.

Robert Graef: The Lake Stevens writer ventures into fiction with “Teachable Moments.” Now finding favor with local book clubs, the novel is set in school districts in the Stillaguamish estuary in the 1990s — though plot elements were drawn from actual happenings through the 1980s and ’90s. Graef wrote the book to generate a more sympathetic view of challenges inherent in properly managing public schools.

Bill Witthuhn: A former teacher and coach in Snohomish, Witthuhn has written a book. “The Contest” is the tale of a business with fading sales that sponsors a contest to get back into the black. Surprises and challenges are expected with any competition, but no one could ever predict it would lead to a school shooting.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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