Composition with books on the table

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Herald staff
  • Sunday, February 14, 2021 1:30am
  • Life

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Events may be canceled or postponed. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Patrick Jennings: Sno-Isle Libraries presents a talk with the children’s book author of “Faith and the Electric Dogs” at 10 a.m. Feb. 20 via Zoom. Since that debut novel, Jennings has written two dozen titles and series, including “Guinea Dog,” “Lucky Cap,” “Invasion of the Dognappers,” “Out Standing in My Field,” “Hissy Fitz” and “My Homework Ate My Homework.” He’s now working on a book about a boy who finds a goat that skateboards and wants to keep him as a pet. It’s called “Skate Goat,” of course. This event is part of Sno-Isle’s new virtual Open Book series. A Zoom link will be emailed after registration. More at www.sno-isle.org/openbook.

NEW BOOKS

Nova McBee: History is not made — it’s calculated. The Edmonds author’s debut novel “Calculated” is the lead title of the new YA imprint, Wise Wolf Books. Set in Shanghai and Seattle, McBee’s novel is a gritty, modern-day blend of “The Count of Monte Cristo” and “Mission Impossible.” It’s about revenge and forgiveness, loss and identity, brainpower versus brutality, and the triumph of right over might. More at www.novamcbee.com.

Roy K. Brown: “Awakened from Oblivion” is the Everett author’s first novel. The tale is set in Darrington and Seattle: Lester and Polly June have been relegated to the scrap heap of shattered souls. With help from a Native American spirit guide, their chance meeting begins a journey to their becoming more than they could have ever imagined. The story takes bends and turns, eventually morphing into a mass murder. Brown’s writing has been published by the Washington Blues Society and American Institute of Inspectors. The retired real estate appraiser and home inspector devotes time every day to writing and story development. Email roykbrown@earthlink.net for more information.

Yvonne Werttemberger: Werttemberger’s “Sarah, Blake and Salt: An Adventure in the Desert” — illustrated by Annabelle Yedinak is a middle-grade novel set in Seattle. What starts as a normal spring break turns mysterious when a brother and sister find themselves in the California desert, hundreds of miles from home and with no way back. Werttemberger, of Langley, started writing the book for young readers after suffering a broken hip, finishing it during the COVID-19 pandemic. More at www.sunacumenpress.com.

Jennifer Bacon: The children’s book, “Be a Big Hero,” shows readers how plastic and litter ends up in our oceans. Outlining the human activities that pollute the seas with our debris, this tale softly teaches children about the terrible effects that littering and overuse of plastic can have on the environment. The Marysville author shows us how we can all be big heroes — and how we can aid in saving all the animals that swim in the seas. Bacon originally wrote this book for her sons, but her dreams were to teach future generations about the impacts of plastic pollution. She is currently working on her second children’s book about climate change. More at www.mrsbossybacon.com.

Iris Fisher Smith: The Stanwood author has written the memoir “Never Alone,” in which she revisits the life stories of her loved ones. She had a grandmother who in her teens idolized Bonnie and Clyde, a father who was friends with Leonard Nimoy and mother who attended school with the Boston Strangler, among others. This family provides a rich history that shaped the author’s life. Her book’s message? When life becomes challenging, it’s the time we need each other the most. More at www.irisfsmith.com.

Jim Jamison: Unleashing the imagination of children is often overlooked. The Bothell author has published the children’s book “What Would I Be If I Couldn’t Be Me?” The book was illustrated by his daughter, Stephanie Schisler, a Bothell High School grad. Jamison was inspired by the birth of his first grandchild to write the book. He owns and operates Foggy Noggin Brewing, a microbrewery in Bothell. Schisler is a part-owner of the family’s brewery and helps her dad brew beer. More at www.facebook.com/noggyimagination.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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