Composition with books on the table

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Sunday, March 7, 2021 1:30am
  • Life

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Events may be canceled or postponed. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Harriet Baskas: Boeing may be the best-known innovator in travel from Washington, but there are many others. The Everett Public Library presents “Washington on Wheels” at 6 p.m. March 9 via Crowdcast. Baskas will cover notable highlights of state transportation history — examining not just how we get around, but why we travel and where we might be going next. Baskas is the author of “Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can’t or Won’t Show You.” She writes about airports, air travel and museums for outlets that include NBC News, CNBC, and USA Today. Register at www.crowdcast.io/e/wheels. A link to the event will be emailed after registration. More at www.epls.org.

Mary Robinette Kowal: Sno-Isle Libraries presents a talk with the author of “The Calculating Stars” at 6:30 p.m March 16 via Zoom. Kowal also is the author of “The Fated Sky” and “The Relentless Moon.” In her books, Kowal reimagines the space race with more active involvement from women and people of color. In her research, she began by assuming that they were involved and had been erased. Kowal will discuss using the tools of fiction to explore race and gender relations in space. This event is part of Sno-Isle’s new virtual Open Book series. A Zoom link will be emailed after registration. More at www.sno-isle.org/openbook.

NEW BOOKS

Carole G. Barton: Her goal is to help 1 million students who struggle to read. “The Friendship Adventure” is the story of a mouse named Bruno who sets off on adventure to make a friend. The chapter book — illustrated by Andre V. Ordonez when he was 12 years old — is meant to teach struggling readers about friendship, problem-solving, emotional intelligence, social skills and speech. Barton is a speech-language pathologist at Sunnyside Elementary School in Marysville. This is the Snohomish author’s first book. More at www.stormpraise.com/carolegbarton.html.

Nova McBee: History is not made — it’s calculated. The Edmonds author’s debut novel “Calculated” is the lead title of the new YA imprint, Wise Wolf Books. Set in Shanghai and Seattle, McBee’s novel is a gritty, modern-day blend of “The Count of Monte Cristo” and “Mission Impossible.” It’s about revenge and forgiveness, loss and identity, brainpower versus brutality, and the triumph of right over might. More at www.novamcbee.com.

Roy K. Brown: “Awakened from Oblivion” is the Everett author’s first novel. The tale is set in Darrington and Seattle: Lester and Polly June have been relegated to the scrap heap of shattered souls. With help from a Native American spirit guide, their chance meeting begins a journey to their becoming more than they could have ever imagined. The story takes bends and turns, eventually morphing into a mass murder. Brown’s writing has been published by the Washington Blues Society and American Institute of Inspectors. The retired real estate appraiser and home inspector devotes time every day to writing and story development. Email roykbrown@earthlink.net for more information.

Yvonne Werttemberger: Werttemberger’s “Sarah, Blake and Salt: An Adventure in the Desert” — illustrated by Annabelle Yedinak is a middle-grade novel set in Seattle. What starts as a normal spring break turns mysterious when a brother and sister find themselves in the California desert, hundreds of miles from home and with no way back. Werttemberger, of Langley, started writing the book for young readers after suffering a broken hip, finishing it during the COVID-19 pandemic. More at www.sunacumenpress.com.

Jennifer Bacon: The children’s book, “Be a Big Hero,” shows readers how plastic and litter ends up in our oceans. Outlining the human activities that pollute the seas with our debris, this tale softly teaches children about the terrible effects that littering and overuse of plastic can have on the environment. The Marysville author shows us how we can all be big heroes — and how we can aid in saving all the animals that swim in the seas. Bacon originally wrote this book for her sons, but her dreams were to teach future generations about the impacts of plastic pollution. She is currently working on her second children’s book about climate change. More at www.mrsbossybacon.com.

Iris Fisher Smith: The Stanwood author has written the memoir “Never Alone,” in which she revisits the life stories of her loved ones. She had a grandmother who in her teens idolized Bonnie and Clyde, a father who was friends with Leonard Nimoy and mother who attended school with the Boston Strangler, among others. This family provides a rich history that shaped the author’s life. Her book’s message? When life becomes challenging, it’s the time we need each other the most. More at www.irisfsmith.com.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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