Composition with books on the table

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Sunday, April 11, 2021 1:30am
  • Life

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Events may be canceled or postponed. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Jenne Alderks: The Neverending Bookshop presents a talk with author of “Who Can? Toucan!” at 2 p.m. April 17 via Zoom. The children’s book follows babies as they reach development milestones — cheered on by a Toucan. Alderks is an early childhood educator in the Everett area who serves her community as a birth and postpartum doula. She began writing children’s books as gifts to her three children and to her doula families. This book is the first in the Bothell author’s “Toucan and Friends” series. Email theneverendingbookshop@gmail.com to get the Zoom link. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Everett Poetry Night: April is National Poetry Month. The Everett Public Library presents “Writers Live: Everett Poetry Night” at 5 p.m. April 20 via Crowdcast. Steve K. Bertrand and Jeanne-Marie Osterman are the two featured poets, whose work is inspired by their lives and experiences in Everett. Bertrand is the author of more than 35 books — many of them featuring haiku collections — including the latest “Old Neanderthals.” Osterman is the author of “There’s a Hum” and “Shellback.” Register at www.crowdcast.io/e/everettpoetry. A link to the event will be emailed after registration. Call 425-257-8000. More at www.epls.org.

Steve K. Bertrand: J. Matheson Gifts, 2615 Colby Ave., Everett, is hosting a book signing with the author of “Old Neanderthals” from 1 to 3 p.m. April 24. The Mukilteo author’s latest book is a collection of 1,000 haiku about life in the Pacific Northwest. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 26 poetry collections, three history books and five children’s books. Bertrand is a teacher and running coach at Cascade High School in Everett. Call 425-258-2287 or go to www.jmatheson.com for more information.

Karen Eisenbrey: The Neverending Bookshop presents a talk with the YA author of “Death’s Midwife” at 3 p.m. May 1 via Zoom. Eisenbrey’s latest book continues the adventures of a mage named Luskell. When she comes across a spirit of legend, all bets are off and Luskell will have to rely on herself and those closest to her to defeat Old Mother Bones. This book is the finale of Eisenbrey’s “Daughter of Magic” trilogy. She also is the author of “The Gospel According to St. Rage” and “Barbara and the Rage Brigade.” Email theneverendingbookshop@gmail.com to get the Zoom link. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

NEW BOOKS

Shannon Kennedy: Josie Malone is the pen name of Shannon Kennedy. The Granite Falls author has released “Family Skeletons” — her third book in the “Baker City: Hearts and Haunts” series. She describes the series as paranormal military romances with a kick. A former Army reservist, Kennedy teaches riding lessons at Horse County Farm and does substitute teaching in several districts. More at www.josiemalone.com.

Carole G. Barton: Her goal is to help 1 million students who struggle to read. “The Friendship Adventure” is the story of a mouse named Bruno who sets off on adventure to make a friend. The chapter book — illustrated by Andre V. Ordonez when he was 12 years old — is meant to teach struggling readers about friendship, problem-solving, emotional intelligence, social skills and speech. Barton is a speech-language pathologist at Sunnyside Elementary School in Marysville. This is the Snohomish author’s first book. More at www.stormpraise.com/carolegbarton.html.

Nova McBee: History is not made — it’s calculated. The Edmonds author’s debut novel “Calculated” is the lead title of the new YA imprint, Wise Wolf Books. Set in Shanghai and Seattle, McBee’s novel is a gritty, modern-day blend of “The Count of Monte Cristo” and “Mission Impossible.” It’s about revenge and forgiveness, loss and identity, brainpower versus brutality, and the triumph of right over might. More at www.novamcbee.com.

Roy K. Brown: “Awakened from Oblivion” is the Everett author’s first novel. The tale is set in Darrington and Seattle: Lester and Polly June have been relegated to the scrap heap of shattered souls. With help from a Native American spirit guide, their chance meeting begins a journey to their becoming more than they could have ever imagined. The story takes bends and turns, eventually morphing into a mass murder. Brown’s writing has been published by the Washington Blues Society and American Institute of Inspectors. The retired real estate appraiser and home inspector devotes time every day to writing and story development. Email roykbrown@earthlink.net for more information.

Yvonne Werttemberger: Werttemberger’s “Sarah, Blake and Salt: An Adventure in the Desert” — illustrated by Annabelle Yedinak is a middle-grade novel set in Seattle. What starts as a normal spring break turns mysterious when a brother and sister find themselves in the California desert, hundreds of miles from home and with no way back. Werttemberger, of Langley, started writing the book for young readers after suffering a broken hip, finishing it during the COVID-19 pandemic. More at www.sunacumenpress.com.

Jennifer Bacon: The children’s book, “Be a Big Hero,” shows readers how plastic and litter ends up in our oceans. Outlining the human activities that pollute the seas with our debris, this tale softly teaches children about the terrible effects that littering and overuse of plastic can have on the environment. The Marysville author shows us how we can all be big heroes — and how we can aid in saving all the animals that swim in the seas. Bacon originally wrote this book for her sons, but her dreams were to teach future generations about the impacts of plastic pollution. She is currently working on her second children’s book about climate change. More at www.mrsbossybacon.com.

Steve K. Bertrand: The Mukilteo author has released a new books of poetry: “Old Neanderthals” is a collection of 1,000 haiku about life in the Pacific Northwest. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 26 poetry collections, three history books and five children’s books. Bertrand is a teacher and running coach at Cascade High School in Everett. More at www.facebook.com/steve.bertrand.965.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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