Composition with books on the table

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Sunday, May 9, 2021 1:30am
  • Life

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Events may be canceled or postponed. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Kelly Jones: The Edmonds Bookshop presents a talk with the author of “Happily for Now” at 6 p.m. May 13 via Facebook Live. Jones will talk about her latest book for young readers, “Happily for Now.” It’s a sometimes funny, always hopeful story about Fiona, who’s trying to solve some big problems by taking fairy godperson lessons. (As one does.) This story is contemporary realistic, but through a fairy tale lens. A former librarian and bookseller, Jones also is the author of the middle-grade books “Murder, Magic, and What We Wore” and “Sauerkraut.” More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

Amee Quriconi: Uppercase Bookshop in Snohomish hosts “An Evening with Amee Quiriconi,” author of “The Fearless Woman’s Guide to Starting a Business,” at 7 p.m. May 13 at Belle Chapel, 231 Ave. B, Snohomish. Quiriconi will do a brief reading, then lead a panel discussion with other local woman business owners. To register, go to uppercasebookshop.com.

David B. Williams: The Edmonds Bookshop presents a talk with the author of “Homewaters: A Human and Natural History of Puget Sound” at 6 p.m. May 26 via Facebook Live. A natural history writer, Williams uncovers human and natural histories in, on and around Puget Sound. A curatorial associate at the Burke Museum, Williams also is the author of “Seattle Walks: Discovering History and Nature in the City” and “Waterway: The Story of Seattle’s Locks and Ship Canal.” More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

NEW BOOKS

Steve K. Bertrand: The Mukilteo author has released a new books of poetry: “Old Neanderthals” is a collection of 1,000 haiku about life in the Pacific Northwest. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 26 poetry collections, three history books and five children’s books. Bertrand is a teacher and running coach at Cascade High School in Everett. More at www.facebook.com/steve.bertrand.965.

Shannon Kennedy: Josie Malone is the pen name of Shannon Kennedy. The Granite Falls author has released “Family Skeletons” — her third book in the “Baker City: Hearts and Haunts” series. She describes the series as paranormal military romances with a kick. A former Army reservist, Kennedy teaches riding lessons at Horse County Farm and does substitute teaching in several districts. More at www.josiemalone.com.

Carole G. Barton: Her goal is to help 1 million students who struggle to read. “The Friendship Adventure” is the story of a mouse named Bruno who sets off on adventure to make a friend. The chapter book — illustrated by Andre V. Ordonez when he was 12 years old — is meant to teach struggling readers about friendship, problem-solving, emotional intelligence, social skills and speech. Barton is a speech-language pathologist at Sunnyside Elementary School in Marysville. This is the Snohomish author’s first book. More at www.stormpraise.com/carolegbarton.html.

Nova McBee: History is not made — it’s calculated. The Edmonds author’s debut novel “Calculated” is the lead title of the new YA imprint, Wise Wolf Books. Set in Shanghai and Seattle, McBee’s novel is a gritty, modern-day blend of “The Count of Monte Cristo” and “Mission Impossible.” It’s about revenge and forgiveness, loss and identity, brainpower versus brutality, and the triumph of right over might. More at www.novamcbee.com.

Roy K. Brown: “Awakened from Oblivion” is the Everett author’s first novel. The tale is set in Darrington and Seattle: Lester and Polly June have been relegated to the scrap heap of shattered souls. With help from a Native American spirit guide, their chance meeting begins a journey to their becoming more than they could have ever imagined. The story takes bends and turns, eventually morphing into a mass murder. Brown’s writing has been published by the Washington Blues Society and American Institute of Inspectors. The retired real estate appraiser and home inspector devotes time every day to writing and story development. Email roykbrown@earthlink.net for more information.

Yvonne Werttemberger: Werttemberger’s “Sarah, Blake and Salt: An Adventure in the Desert” — illustrated by Annabelle Yedinak is a middle-grade novel set in Seattle. What starts as a normal spring break turns mysterious when a brother and sister find themselves in the California desert, hundreds of miles from home and with no way back. Werttemberger, of Langley, started writing the book for young readers after suffering a broken hip, finishing it during the COVID-19 pandemic. More at www.sunacumenpress.com.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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