Composition with books on the table

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Sunday, June 6, 2021 1:30am
  • Life

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Events may be canceled or postponed. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Garth Stein and Matthew Southworth: Sno-Isle Libraries presents a talk with the author and illustrator of the graphic novel series “The Cloven” at 6:30 p.m June 16 via Zoom. Garth Stein and Matthew Southworth collaborated on the action-packed story about a goat-hooved mutant from the Pacific Northwest. Stein is the author of several books, including “The Art of Racing in the Rain” and “A Sudden Light.” Southworth is an artist known for his work on “Stumptown,” the comic series behind the television drama of the same name. This event is part of Sno-Isle’s virtual Open Book series. A Zoom link will be emailed after registration. More at www.sno-isle.org/openbook.

Peter Moe: The Edmonds Bookshop presents a talk with the author of “Touching This Leviathan” at 6 p.m. June 17 via Facebook Live. “Touching This Leviathan” asks how we might come to know the unknowable — in this case, whales, animals so large yet so elusive, revealing just a sliver of back, a glimpse of a fluke, or a split-second breach before diving away. Drawing on biology, theology, natural history, literature and writing studies, Moe offers a deep dive into the alluring and impalpable mysteries of Earth’s largest mammal. More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

Donna Barba Higuera: Sno-Isle Libraries presents a talk with the author of the middle-grade book “Lupe Wong Won’t Dance” at 10 a.m. June 18 via Zoom. “Lupe Wong Won’t Dance” is full of complicated situations and a Mexican-Chinese heroine who muddles through her mistakes, one bad decision at a time. The book was selected for a Pura Belpre Honor Award, Best Books for Youth List by the American Library Association and Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award. This event is part of Sno-Isle’s virtual Open Book series. A Zoom link will be emailed after registration. More at www.sno-isle.org/openbook.

Kizzie Jones and Scott Ward: The Neverending Bookshop presents a talk with the author and illustrator of “Dachshunds in Costumes” at 2 p.m. July 10 via Zoom. The picture book is a tall tale about dachshunds that decide to dress up in costumes, and then stay that way! Jones and Ward have also collaborated on the tall tales “How Dachshunds Came to Be” and “A Dachshund and a Pelican.” Email theneverendingbookshop@gmail.com to get the Zoom link. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

NEW BOOKS

Steve K. Bertrand: The Mukilteo author has released a new books of poetry: “Old Neanderthals” is a collection of 1,000 haiku about life in the Pacific Northwest. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 26 poetry collections, three history books and five children’s books. Bertrand is a teacher and running coach at Cascade High School in Everett. More at www.facebook.com/steve.bertrand.965.

Shannon Kennedy: Josie Malone is the pen name of Shannon Kennedy. The Granite Falls author has released “Family Skeletons” — her third book in the “Baker City: Hearts and Haunts” series. She describes the series as paranormal military romances with a kick. A former Army reservist, Kennedy teaches riding lessons at Horse County Farm and does substitute teaching in several districts. More at www.josiemalone.com.

Carole G. Barton: Her goal is to help 1 million students who struggle to read. “The Friendship Adventure” is the story of a mouse named Bruno who sets off on adventure to make a friend. The chapter book — illustrated by Andre V. Ordonez when he was 12 years old — is meant to teach struggling readers about friendship, problem-solving, emotional intelligence, social skills and speech. Barton is a speech-language pathologist at Sunnyside Elementary School in Marysville. This is the Snohomish author’s first book. More at www.stormpraise.com/carolegbarton.html.

Nova McBee: History is not made — it’s calculated. The Edmonds author’s debut novel “Calculated” is the lead title of the new YA imprint, Wise Wolf Books. Set in Shanghai and Seattle, McBee’s novel is a gritty, modern-day blend of “The Count of Monte Cristo” and “Mission Impossible.” It’s about revenge and forgiveness, loss and identity, brainpower versus brutality, and the triumph of right over might. More at www.novamcbee.com.

Roy K. Brown: “Awakened from Oblivion” is the Everett author’s first novel. The tale is set in Darrington and Seattle: Lester and Polly June have been relegated to the scrap heap of shattered souls. With help from a Native American spirit guide, their chance meeting begins a journey to their becoming more than they could have ever imagined. The story takes bends and turns, eventually morphing into a mass murder. Brown’s writing has been published by the Washington Blues Society and American Institute of Inspectors. The retired real estate appraiser and home inspector devotes time every day to writing and story development. Email roykbrown@earthlink.net for more information.

Yvonne Werttemberger: Werttemberger’s “Sarah, Blake and Salt: An Adventure in the Desert” — illustrated by Annabelle Yedinak is a middle-grade novel set in Seattle. What starts as a normal spring break turns mysterious when a brother and sister find themselves in the California desert, hundreds of miles from home and with no way back. Werttemberger, of Langley, started writing the book for young readers after suffering a broken hip, finishing it during the COVID-19 pandemic. More at www.sunacumenpress.com.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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