Composition with books on the table

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Sunday, July 4, 2021 1:30am
  • Life

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Events may be canceled or postponed. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Libby Copeland: The Everett Public Library presents a talk with the author of “The Lost Family” at noon July 7 via Crowdcast. Copeland is an award-winning journalist who writes about culture, science and human behavior. Her book looks at the impact of home DNA testing on the American family. Register for the event at www.crowdcast.io/e/lostfamily. A Crowdcast link to the event will be emailed after registration. More at www.epls.org.

Casey McQuiston: Sno-Isle Libraries presents a talk with the bestselling author of “Red, White & Royal Blue” at 3 p.m. July 8 via Zoom. Mcquiston’s debut novel was the winner of the 2020 Alex Award. In 2019, their novel also won both the Best Romance and Best Debut Novel in the 11th Annual Goodreads Choice Awards. A Zoom link to the event will be emailed after registration. More at www.sno-isle.org.

Kizzie Jones and Scott Ward: The Neverending Bookshop presents a talk with the author and illustrator of “Dachshunds in Costumes” at 2 p.m. July 10 via Zoom. The picture book is a tall tale about dachshunds that decide to dress up in costumes, and then stay that way! Jones and Ward have also collaborated on the tall tales “How Dachshunds Came to Be” and “A Dachshund and a Pelican.” Email theneverendingbookshop@gmail.com to get the Zoom link. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

NEW BOOKS

Nicki Chen: The Edmonds author’s new novel, “When in Vanuatu,” explores the world of ex-pat living, in particular for the spouses of those working abroad. Chen earned her master’s degree in fine arts from the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Also the author of “Tiger Tail Soup,” Chen’s new book grew out of her experiences during the 20 years she lived with her husband and their three daughters in the Philippines and the South Pacific. More at nickichenwrites.com.

Steve K. Bertrand: The Mukilteo author has released a new books of poetry: “Old Neanderthals” is a collection of 1,000 haiku about life in the Pacific Northwest. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 26 poetry collections, three history books and five children’s books. Bertrand is a teacher and running coach at Cascade High School in Everett. More at www.facebook.com/steve.bertrand.965.

Shannon Kennedy: Josie Malone is the pen name of Shannon Kennedy. The Granite Falls author has released “Family Skeletons,” her third book in the “Baker City: Hearts and Haunts” series. She describes the series as paranormal military romances with a kick. A former Army reservist, Kennedy teaches riding lessons at Horse County Farm and does substitute teaching in several districts. More at www.josiemalone.com.

Carole G. Barton: Her goal is to help 1 million students who struggle to read. “The Friendship Adventure” is the story of a mouse named Bruno who sets off on adventure to make a friend. The chapter book — illustrated by Andre V. Ordonez when he was 12 years old — is meant to teach struggling readers about friendship, problem-solving, emotional intelligence, social skills and speech. Barton is a speech-language pathologist at Sunnyside Elementary School in Marysville. This is the Snohomish author’s first book. More at www.stormpraise.com/carolegbarton.html.

Nova McBee: History is not made — it’s calculated. The Edmonds author’s debut novel “Calculated” is the lead title of the new YA imprint, Wise Wolf Books. Set in Shanghai and Seattle, McBee’s novel is a gritty, modern-day blend of “The Count of Monte Cristo” and “Mission Impossible.” It’s about revenge and forgiveness, loss and identity, brainpower versus brutality, and the triumph of right over might. More at www.novamcbee.com.

Roy K. Brown: “Awakened from Oblivion” is the Everett author’s first novel. The tale is set in Darrington and Seattle: Lester and Polly June have been relegated to the scrap heap of shattered souls. With help from a Native American spirit guide, their chance meeting begins a journey to their becoming more than they could have ever imagined. The story takes bends and turns, eventually morphing into a mass murder. Brown’s writing has been published by the Washington Blues Society and American Institute of Inspectors. The retired real estate appraiser and home inspector devotes time every day to writing and story development. Email roykbrown@earthlink.net for more information.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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