Composition with books on the table

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Sunday, September 12, 2021 1:30am
  • Life

Omar El Akkad: Sno-Isle Libraries presents a talk with the author of “What Strange Paradise” at 3 p.m. Sept. 15 via Zoom. His debut novel, “American War,” won the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, the Oregon Book Award for fiction, and the Kobo Emerging Writer Prize. El Akkad’s follow-up novel is the story of two children finding their way through a hostile world. This event is part of Sno-Isle’s virtual Open Book series. A Zoom link will be emailed after registration. More at www.sno-isle.org/openbook.

Nan Harty: Milkwood Custom Furniture & Home Decor, 113 W Main St., Monroe, is hosting a poetry reading at 7 p.m. Sept. 15. Harty will read from her poetry collection “The Telling of the Trees.” It’s a compilation of 20 years worth of writing by the Sultan resident. There will be an open mic, if you wish to read a poem or two. Call 206-914-5505 or go to www.milkwoodonmain.com for more information.

Louise Cypress: Louise Cypress is the pen name of Jennifer Bardsley. The Edmonds Bookshop presents a talk with the author of “Quick Fix” at 6 p.m. Sept. 16 via Facebook Live. Three teens are caught in a bioterrorism plot to destroy Seattle involving a diet drink that kills. This book is meant to be a companion to “Narcosis Room.” The Edmonds’ author also wrote the young adult novels “Genesis Girl” and “Damaged Goods.” More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

Kelly Brenner: Even in the most urban of areas, nature is there; we just have to change our perspective. The Everett Public Library presents a talk with the author of “Nature Obscura: A City’s Hidden Natural World” at 6 p.m. Sept. 16 via Crowdcast. A naturalist, Brenner will share the secrets to finding your own diverse and wild neighbors from park to rooftop and everything in between. Register for the free talk at www.crowdcast.io/e/brenner. Call 425-257-8000 or go to www.epls.org for more information.

Lorraine Brown: The Neverending Bookshop presents a talk with the author of “The Paris Connection” at noon Sept. 25 via Zoom. In the book, Hannah and her boyfriend, Simon, are separated between flights on the way to Hannah’s sister’s wedding. At the airport, Hannah meets a man named Leo — who is everything Simon is not. Brown was a mentee for the Penguin RandomHouse UK’s 2018 WriteNow program. This is the author’s debut novel. “Email theneverendingbookshop@gmail.com to get the Zoom link. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Write on the Sound: The writer’s conference, scheduled for Oct. 1-3, will be held online again this year. The keynote speaker is Lisa See, the bestselling author of “Shanghai Girls.” See will speak Oct. 2 on “Building the Story: Writers’ Process & Research.” Find a list of presentations and speakers’ biographies, as well as registration and fees information, at www.writeonthesound.com.

NEW BOOKS

Natalie Johnson: The Everett author worked on her memoir “An Angel Named Sadie” for 15 years. Johnson lost her newborn named Sadie when the new mother was just 19 years old. Hers is a story of grief — but it’s also about how a 3-month-old child with a faulty heart would inexorably alter the author’s life forever. Email nmjandddj_06@yahoo.com for more information.

Amanda Johnson: The Mountlake Terrace author’s debut novel is a perfect read for summer. She recommends you bring “East of Manhattan” with you to the beach or the pool. Julie and Scott Cutter made a deal: Scott will work for two years as a butler for a TV star, then they will start the family Julie has always wanted. But Julie is approaching prenatal geriatric status — and her husband lives in the basement of his celebrity boss’ Manhattan mansion instead of with her in Queens. More at amanda-johnson.com/writer.

Nicki Chen: The Edmonds author’s new novel, “When in Vanuatu,” explores the world of ex-pat living, in particular for the spouses of those working abroad. Chen earned her master’s degree in fine arts from the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Also the author of “Tiger Tail Soup,” Chen’s new book grew out of her experiences during the 20 years she lived with her husband and their three daughters in the Philippines and the South Pacific. More at nickichenwrites.com.

Steve K. Bertrand: The Mukilteo author has released a new books of poetry: “Old Neanderthals” is a collection of 1,000 haiku about life in the Pacific Northwest. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 26 poetry collections, three history books and five children’s books. Bertrand is a teacher and running coach at Cascade High School in Everett. More at www.facebook.com/steve.bertrand.965.

Josie Malone: Josie Malone is the pen name of Shannon Kennedy. The Granite Falls author has released “Family Skeletons,” her third book in the “Baker City: Hearts and Haunts” series. She describes the series as paranormal military romances with a kick. A former Army reservist, Kennedy teaches riding lessons at Horse County Farm and does substitute teaching in several districts. More at www.josiemalone.com.

Carole G. Barton: Her goal is to help 1 million students who struggle to read. “The Friendship Adventure” is the story of a mouse named Bruno who sets off on adventure to make a friend. The chapter book — illustrated by Andre V. Ordonez when he was 12 years old — is meant to teach struggling readers about friendship, problem-solving, emotional intelligence, social skills and speech. Barton is a speech-language pathologist at Sunnyside Elementary School in Marysville. This is the Snohomish author’s first book. More at www.stormpraise.com/carolegbarton.html.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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