Composition with books on the table

Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

The listings include Third Place Books, Everett Public Library and Neverending Bookshop events.

  • Sunday, September 26, 2021 1:30am
  • Life

Write on the Sound: The writer’s conference, scheduled for Oct. 1-3, will be held online again this year. The keynote speaker is Lisa See, the bestselling author of “Shanghai Girls.” See will speak Oct. 2 on “Building the Story: Writers’ Process & Research.” Find a list of presentations and speakers’ biographies, as well as registration and fees information, at www.writeonthesound.com.

Shawn Adair Johnston: The Neverending Bookshop presents a talk with the author of “How the Blind Detective and His Seeing Eye Dog Saved the Narwhals” at 2 p.m. Oct. 9 via Zoom. This futuristic novel takes on the extinction of the narwhals via poaching, and the unique team sent to the Canadian Arctic to save the unicorns of the sea. It’s the first book in Johnston’s “Peter Straw, Third Eye” sci-fi series, set in the year 2079, featuring a blind detective and his seeing eye dog. Johnston, himself, also is blind. Email theneverendingbookshop@gmail.com to get the Zoom link. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Rebecca Roanhorse and P. Djèlí Clark: Sno-Isle Libraries presents a talk with the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus award- winning authors at 6 p.m. Oct. 19 via Zoom. Roanhouse is the author of “Black Sun,” an a fantasy page-turner set in Mesoamerica. Her work includes “Trail of Lightning” and “Race to the Sun.” Clark is the author of “A Master of Djinn,” a novel that takes place in an alternate Cairo. His works include “Ring Shout” and “The Black God’s Drums.” This event is part of Sno-Isle’s virtual Open Book series. A Zoom link will be emailed after registration. More at www.sno-isle.org/openbook.

Emily Ladau: The Neverending Bookshop presents a talk with the author of “Demystifying Disability: What to Know, What to Say, and How to be an Ally” at noon Oct. 23 via Zoom. An advocate for disabled rights, Ladau’s work has appeared in The New York Times, SELF, Salon, Vice and HuffPost. She is the editor-in-chief of the Rooted in Rights Blog, which promotes stories about the intersectional disabled community. Email theneverendingbookshop@gmail.com to get the Zoom link. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Kip Greenthal: 6 p.m. Oct. 28, Edmonds Bookshop, 111 Fifth Ave. S. Edmonds. Greenthal is the author of “Shoal Water,” winner of the 2020 Landmark Prize for Fiction. The story follows Kate’s passage out of dependence into self-possession. It is a compelling story of navigating dangerous waters and gaining the power to redeem loss and find forgiveness and belief in the unimaginable. It takes place in Nova Scotia, where Greenthal lived for 12 years. More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

NEW BOOKS

Natalie Johnson: The Everett author worked on her memoir “An Angel Named Sadie” for 15 years. Johnson lost her newborn named Sadie when the new mother was just 19 years old. Hers is a story of grief — but it’s also about how a 3-month-old child with a faulty heart would inexorably alter the author’s life forever. Email nmjandddj_06@yahoo.com for more information.

Amanda Johnson: The Mountlake Terrace author’s debut novel is a perfect read for summer. She recommends you bring “East of Manhattan” with you to the beach or the pool. Julie and Scott Cutter made a deal: Scott will work for two years as a butler for a TV star, then they will start the family Julie has always wanted. But Julie is approaching prenatal geriatric status — and her husband lives in the basement of his celebrity boss’ Manhattan mansion instead of with her in Queens. More at amanda-johnson.com/writer.

Nicki Chen: The Edmonds author’s new novel, “When in Vanuatu,” explores the world of ex-pat living, in particular for the spouses of those working abroad. Chen earned her master’s degree in fine arts from the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Also the author of “Tiger Tail Soup,” Chen’s new book grew out of her experiences during the 20 years she lived with her husband and their three daughters in the Philippines and the South Pacific. More at nickichenwrites.com.

Steve K. Bertrand: The Mukilteo author has released a new books of poetry: “Old Neanderthals” is a collection of 1,000 haiku about life in the Pacific Northwest. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 26 poetry collections, three history books and five children’s books. Bertrand is a teacher and running coach at Cascade High School in Everett. More at www.facebook.com/steve.bertrand.965.

Josie Malone: Josie Malone is the pen name of Shannon Kennedy. The Granite Falls author has released “Family Skeletons,” her third book in the “Baker City: Hearts and Haunts” series. She describes the series as paranormal military romances with a kick. A former Army reservist, Kennedy teaches riding lessons at Horse County Farm and does substitute teaching in several districts. More at www.josiemalone.com.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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