Author events and poetry readings around Snohomish County

Tarryn Fisher: 6 p.m. Jan. 4, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. Imagine that your husband has two other wives. You’ve never met the other wives. None of you know each other, and because of this unconventional arrangement, you can see your husband only one day a week. But you love him so much you don’t care. Or at least that’s what you’ve told yourself. This is the story line of “The Wives,” Fisher’s latest novel. She is the bestselling author of nine novels, having also written “We Came Here to Forget” and “She Regrets Nothing.” More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

Lucas P. Kok: 10:30 a.m. Jan. 4, The Neverending Bookshop, 7530 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds. Kok’s book, “Taima the Seahawk,” is a tale about the watchful protector of Seattle, who sees his town’s football team suffer a heartbreaking loss in their first Super Bowl. He realizes he must lead them in showing the world what it means to be a Seahawk. More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

Melissa Hartwig Urban: 7 p.m. Jan. 6, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. Healthy recipes for parties and celebrations are complied in “The Whole30 Friends & Family.” The book provides Whole30 menus and recipes for everyday social occasions from birthday parties to baby showers, movie night, tailgating and more. More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

Walt Gragg: 7 p.m. Jan. 8, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. Gragg’s “The Chosen One” is the story of a fundamentalist Islamic army on the march in the Middle East. The fight to stop the spread of madness will take everything the American military can muster. Gragg is a Vietnam veteran who also wrote the novel “The Red Line.” More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

Kiersten White: 7 p.m. Jan. 9, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. Nina continues to learn how to use her slayer powers against enemies old and new in “Chosen,” the second novel in White’s “Slayer” series, set in the world of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” White is the bestselling author of many books for YA readers, including “And Darken,” “Now I Rise,” “Bright We Burn” and “The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein.” More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

Doug Margeson: 6 p.m. Jan. 10, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. Margeson’s “Gazing in the Distant Lights,” set in 1964, follows Tom Brewer in his freshman year at Seattle Pacific College, who was sent there against his will by parents who think “It will do you a world of good.” Margeson is an award-winning former journalist and writer of short stories and creative nonfiction. More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

Catherine Fransson: Noon Jan. 11, Edmonds Bookshop, 111 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds. The Everett native wrote a memoir about her relationship with her parents. “Loving the Enemy: When The Favorite Parent Dies First” shares how Fransson grappled with getting acquainted with her father after Mother died first. This memoir reveals how estrangement can be overcome with courage, time and an open heart. More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

James D. Macon: 2 p.m. Jan. 11, The Neverending Bookshop, 7530 Olympic View Drive, Edmonds. The fourth book in Macon’s Phosfire Journeys series, “Guardian of the Trade,” follows the the further adventures of Zeal, Tulip, Kit and Tallen. Macon is a semi-retired pediatrician in Lynnwood who also is the author of “Purveyors & Acquires,” “The Phosfire Journeys” and “Opener of Doors.” More at www.theneverendingbookshop.com.

James D. Shipman: 6 p.m. Jan. 11, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. A book in the tradition of “Saving Private Ryan” and “Bridge Over the River Kwai,” Shipman’s “Task Force Baum” tells an action-packed story that illustrates the long-buried secrets and unending costs of war, based on the true story of Gen. George S. Patton’s clandestine unauthorized raid on a World War II POW camp. Shipman is the bestselling author of four historical novels: “Constantinopolis,” “Going Home,” “It Is Well” and “A Bitter Rain.” More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

Colleen Hoover: 7 p.m. Jan. 13, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. Morgan Grant and her 16-year-old daughter, Clara, would like nothing more than to be nothing alike. In “Regretting You,” Morgan is determined to prevent her daughter from making the same mistakes she did. By getting pregnant and married way too young, Morgan put her own dreams on hold. Clara doesn’t want to follow in her mother’s footsteps. Her predictable mother doesn’t have a spontaneous bone in her body. Hoover is the bestselling author of several novels, including “It Ends with Us” and “Verity.” More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

Steve Inskeep: 7 p.m. Jan. 15, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. “Imperfect Union” tells the story of John and Jessie Frémont, the husband-and-wife team who in the 1800s were instrumental in the westward expansion of the United States, and thus became America’s first great political couple. Inskeep is a co-host for NPR “Morning Edition” radio show and of NPR’s “Up First” podcast. More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

Jim Moats and Kim Lorenz: 6 p.m. Jan. 17, Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park. Two business books: Moats’ “Leading from the Edge of the Inside” helps define invisible patterns that no longer serves a business and offers the structure to playfully practice shifting those patterns. In “Tireless,” Lorenz tells his story of founding two companies, running them successfully and selling them to Fortune 500 companies. More at www.thirdplacebooks.com.

Kate Alice Marshall: Noon Jan. 18, Edmonds Bookshop, 111 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds. The young adult novel, “Rules for Vanishing,” tells its story in a faux-documentary style of “The Blair Witch Project,” with a missing girl, a vengeful ghost and the girl who is determined to find her sister — at all costs. Marshall is the author of “I Am Still Alive” and is working on a new “Elden Eld” middle grade series. More at www.edmondsbookshop.com.

POETRY READINGS

The Neverending Bookshop: 6 p.m. first Fridays. The bookshop hosts a Flash Fiction and Poetry Slam at 7530 Olympic View Drive, Suite 105, Edmonds. All poets and short fiction/non-fiction writers are welcome. Call 425-415-1945.

Edmonds Bookshop: 5 p.m. third Thursdays. Third Thursday Art Walk poetry readings are held during the Everett Art Walk at the bookshop, 111 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds. Call 425-775-2789 for more.

Black Lab Gallery: 7 p.m. Mondays. The gallery offers a poetry reading each Monday evening at 1618 Hewitt Ave., Everett. For more information, call 425-512-9476.

Cafe Zippy: 7 p.m. Thursdays. Everett Poetry Night at the cafe is on most Thursday evenings at 1502 Rucker Ave., Everett. Call 425-303-0474.

Hibulb Cultural Center: 6 p.m. first Thursdays. The museum’s Open Mic Poetry series continues. In the Longhouse Room at 6410 23rd Ave. NE, Tulalip. Visit www.hibulbculturalcenter.org for more.

NEW BOOKS

Steve K. Bertrand: The Mukilteo author has released another book of poetry: “Living Amongst the Sasquatch and Other Poems” is a collection of poetry about life in the Pacific Northwest. All of the poems were written over the last 40 years. The award-winning poet, historian and photographer has published 28 books. Find them on Amazon.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Books” to features@heraldnet.com.

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