Eric Kosart (left) and Brooks Hutton of Cave Swallows perform at The Garden Series on June 28 in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Eric Kosart (left) and Brooks Hutton of Cave Swallows perform at The Garden Series on June 28 in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Back to the garden: Everett band’s summer house parties bloom

Narrow Tarot host the shows in the back yard of two members’ Riverside home.

EVERETT — It started as an excuse for local rock band Narrow Tarot to play music and party with their friends.

Now The Garden Series is blooming — just like the bushes in the Riverside back yard where the band hosts its monthly all-ages shows May through August.

The next show is July 26 and will feature three bands, including Everett’s own Whatever, Man.

“We’re providing a cool spot for people to come and talk and watch the bands,” said Trevor Fett, who plays guitar and sings with Narrow Tarot. “It’s like going to a show at the Black Lab Gallery or anywhere downtown, but here it’s a little bit different atmosphere. It’s a home.”

Fett, 25, lives in the house with his girlfriend, Tessa Tasakos, 24, who plays keyboard and sings for Narrow Tarot (pronounced TEH-row). Other band members are Jo Krassin (drums), 27, and Marcus Chavez (bass), 27.

The beachy surf-rock band formed in 2018. Locally, they’ve gigged at Fisherman’s Village Music Festival, Black Lab Gallery, Tony V’s Garage and Vintage Cafe. Inspired by friends’ house parties, and wanting to build on Everett’s music scene, they launched The Garden Series last year.

The band Narrow Tarot — (from left) Tessa Tasakos, Marcus Chavez, Trevor Fett and Jo Krassin and Trevor Fett — hosts The Garden Series in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

The band Narrow Tarot — (from left) Tessa Tasakos, Marcus Chavez, Trevor Fett and Jo Krassin and Trevor Fett — hosts The Garden Series in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

They built a stage, invested in sound equipment and designed logos, and waited for people to come. They did; turnout has averaged 50 to 60 people, peaking at around 90.

The shows typically last about four hours and feature two to three acts playing anything from rock to funk. The July 26 show will include psych rock, dream pop and experimental rock.

You’d think a noisy house party would be a neighbor’s worst nightmare — but guess again.

“Sometimes the neighbors say they open their window and let the music come in,” Tasakos said. “It’s kind of crazy, but a lot of people around here play music or just really enjoy live music.”

While the music stops outside at 10 p.m., the party keeps going inside for a few more hours.

The free summer Garden Series shows host local bands in an intimate backyard venue. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

The free summer Garden Series shows host local bands in an intimate backyard venue. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

The show series gets its name because the stage is next to Tasakos’ garden, which grows strawberries, onions, kale, celery, tomatoes, squash, lavender, thyme, potatoes and squash.

“The environment you’re throwing the show in can add so much to the experience,” she said. “It’s not a grungy house show. There’s a sense of class.”

If you want a break from the music, you can hang out inside. Play Mario Kart, or jam with other musicians downstairs where Narrow Tarot rehearses.

Alex Johnston, 27, of Everett, is a fan of the Garden Series after finding out about it on Facebook. He’s been to nearly every show.

“I didn’t know a whole lot of people, but it felt welcoming and buzzing with energy,” he said. “People were drinking, listening to music, talking and having a good time.

“I don’t know if there’s anything quite like it.”

Evan Thompson: 425-339-3427, ethompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @ByEvanThompson.

If you go

The next Garden Series show will feature WEEP WAVE, Jupiter Sprites and Whatever, Man at 7:30 p.m. July 26 at the Fett-Tasakos house, 2112 E. Grand Ave., Everett.

BYOB. The homeowners ask attendees to be respectful of neighbors. Don’t park in the alley.

More at www.facebook.com/narrowtarot.

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