Despite stuffiness, ‘Concussion’ could spur debate

“Concussion” joins the small collection of investigative films arriving at the end of 2015, with “Spotlight” and “Truth” and the German picture “Labyrinth of Lies.” This one might actually move the needle on its subject.

The true story chronicled here looks at Dr. Bennet Omalu, the Nigerian-born forensic pathologist who established a connection between football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. That research has already led to changes in NFL rules and increased scrutiny of former players.

All those shots to the head, all those concussions — acknowledged or, frequently, not — have created a class of ex-players struggling with depression, erratic behavior and memory loss.

The film casts Will Smith as Omalu, a gentle but determined soul working in a pathology lab in Pittsburgh. That’s how he gets a look at the brain of former Steeler Mike Webster (played, hauntingly, by David Morse), who died at age 50 in 2002.

From there, Omalu faces an obstacle course erected by the National Football League, which comes to resemble Big Tobacco in its dogged attempts to deny something that is increasingly obvious: that a career in football is a deadly gamble.

Writer-director Peter Landesman takes a nicely low-key approach to some of this, but the subplots feel like Hollywood string-pulling: the shy Omalu takes in a fellow immigrant (splendid Gugu Mbatha-Raw, from “Beyond the Lights”) and slowly falls for her, while the NFL’s flunkies apparently wage a campaign of bullying and intimidation against him.

The film is respectable to the point of stuffiness. Even Will Smith’s effortless movie-star charisma can’t enliven his saintly character (neither Albert Brooks nor Alec Baldwin, as sympathetic doctors, generate much liveliness).

“Concussion” has one interesting running theme, about how America has stopped being the place of fulfilling dreams, for immigrants or others. When that disenchanted mantra keeps getting repeated in a wide-release picture starring Will Smith, something may really be up.

But I wish the film had pursued its story’s other implication, which suggests the way we’d all rather embrace fantasy than face reality — this is, after all, a movie about science denial, that maddeningly timely subject.

This extends not just to the NFL’s attempts to sidestep CTE data but to fandom as well. I’m a lifelong football fan, but the CTE stuff has made me queasy at times while watching the Seahawks flying around the field. On that score, it’ll be interesting to see whether people actually turn out to see this bearer of bad holiday tidings.

“Concussion” (2½ stars)

A low-key, even stuffy account of the pathologist (Will Smith) who first made the correlation between playing football and chronic traumatic encephalopathy — much to the NFL’s chagrin. Not an exciting movie, but one that might actually move the needle on its subject.

Rating: PG-13, for subject matter

Showing: Alderwood, Everett Stadium, Galaxy Monroe, Marysville, Stanwood Cinema, Pacific Place, Woodinville, Thornton Place, Cascade Mall.

Talk to us

More in Life

Cinderella_Red.jpg: Red Riding Hood (Katelynn Carlson) gets advice from Cinderella (Grace Helmcke) in Red Curtain’s production of Into the Woods, running May 20-June 5 at the Red Curtain Arts Center, 9315 State Ave. in Marysville.
Music, theater and more: What’s happening in Snohomish County

Marysville troupe stages a Stephen Sondheim musical masterpiece. Jazz, featuring the sons of legend Dave Brubeck, takes over Edmonds. And there’s this music festival in downtown Everett …

Sam Bowles records the run off the water from a chalk drawing with friend and co-artist, Rhyanna Mercer, Tuesday afternoon in Everett, Washington on May 10, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Jackson High’s global TikTok star is chalk full of ideas

Sam Bowles, 18, uses vibrant videos and social media fame to raise awareness of autism.

Lonicera ciliosa, commonly called orange honeysuckle or western trumpet vine. (Richie Steffen)
Great Plant Pick: orange honeysuckle

Its orange trumpets announce spring is here, and hummingbirds are irresistibly drawn to it.

Home & garden happenings in Snohomish County

The Mill Creek Garden Tour will return this summer after a two-year absence due to COVID-19.

Photo Caption: Would you believe a zipper sold for $18,450 at Morphy Auctions? What about a diamond necklace that looks and works like a zipper?
X-Y-Z spells ‘big money’ with this high-fashion zipper

It’s actually a necklace, but the zipper function works. Someone paid nearly $18,500 for it at a recent auction.

The signature retro VW bus is on display at the Lamb & Co. home decor store Saturday afternoon in Snohomish, Washington on January 8, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
This Snohomish store has the goods from HGTV’s ‘Unsellable House’

Take home the design and decor savvy of hometown real estate twins Lyndsay Lamb and Leslie Davis.

The 2022 Infiniti QX60 Sensory has seating for seven. Heated outboard second-row seats and power-return third-row seats are standard equipment. (Manufacturer photo)
Infiniti QX60 Sensory model doesn’t play second fiddle

The new Autograph version tops the 2022 lineup, but this previous headliner holds its own.

Caption: Originally published in The Weekly Herald, “I Brake for Moms” has been running for ten years.
Ten years of columns later, a celebration of place, journalism

Jennifer Bardsley reflects on writing 520 installments of “I Brake for Moms.”

Joel Smallbone, left, and Luke Smallbone, right, of the group for King & Country, performs during the Dove Awards on Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Music, theater and more: What’s happening in Snohomish County

The award-winning Christian pop duo For King & Country performs in Everett on Saturday.

Most Read