Everett dance school’s goal: ‘Interact with the community’

The Dance School of Everett is on a campaign to make its presence better known.

The nonprofit school, located in the former Betty Spooner ballet studio since 2006, has scheduled two brief and inexpensive performances of four dances designed to draw in curious audiences.

“It will be the first of many studio performances,” school manager Heidi Heimarck said. “Later this year, we hope to bring flashmobs of dance around the city. Our goal is to interact with the community.”

“I Love to Dance: A studio performance of original and solo works” will be performed at 7 p.m. Feb. 22 and 2 p.m. Feb. 23 at the school, upstairs at 2821 Rockefeller Ave.

Organizers of the hour-long performance hope that people will call 425-259-6861 to reserve a seat. The suggestion donation for the show is $5, which includes dessert.

Teacher and student performers include Maryevva Craggs, Ojeaneya Ellis, Sammi Hanks, Anne Cecilia Stamm, Bryn Wells-Edwards, Rowan Wells-Edwards, Bryenna Bird, Samanatha Burton, Annalea Stocking, Parker Anderson, Lauren Myslak, Haley Tabor, Sarah Seder, Amelia Sorenson, Sophia Turner and Coty McGowan and his hip hop crew of boys.

The school teaches ballet, modern dance, jazz and musical theater styles, along with tap and hip hop. It has a partnership with Village Theatre’s Kidstage programs.

The school’s faculty include university trained and experienced professional dancers.

For example, Sarah Seder, 28, in her fifth year of teaching in Everett, earned a degree in dance from Bard College in New York. Along with ballet, modern and jazz dance, she is trained in flamenco, ballroom and West African dance. Seder is a founding member of Seattle’s Sapience Dance Collective.

“The Dance School is family oriented,” Seder said. “We have a great facility and great classes. We hope to develop a real dance company.”

The students range in age from 3 to 60 and travel to the school from throughout the county, Heimarck said.

“The Dance School is this little gem in downtown Everett,” Heimarck said. “It’s a happy place. Dancing helps people breathe better and bloom.”

Ballet student Bryenna Bird, 10, agrees.

“Dancing makes me feel like nothing else matters,” she said.

More information about The Dance School is available at www.thedanceschool.org.

Gale Fiege: 425-339-3427; gfiege@heraldnet.com.

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