Family fun calendar

Events

Cascade Mountain Men: The group presents its annual Muzzleloading Arms and Pioneer Craft Show on March 9 and 10 at the Evergreen Fairgrounds. More than 300 vendors and exhibitors will be on hand with leather and fur goods, camping gear and period costumes. Demonstrations include blacksmithing, wool spinning and wood carving. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $5 a day; teens younger than 16 must be accompanied by an adult; kids 12 and younger are free. Parking is free. For more information, call 425-890-7208 or go to www.cascademountainmen.com.

Guest Performer Series: The Clan Heather Dancers, a youth group dance troupe, will perform at 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. March 9, Imagine Children’s Museum, 1502 Wall St., Everett. General admission $9; children 1 year and younger free. Call 425-258-1006 or go to www.imaginecm.org.

Theater

Seattle

“The Edge of Peace”: Set in a small town at the end of World War II, this story reveals the power of community when Tuc, a deaf man, goes from town outcast to beloved resident; through March 17, Seattle Children’s Theatre, 201 Thomas St., Seattle; Tickets are $20. Call 206-441.3322 or go to www.sct.org. Discounts for groups of 10 or more are available by calling the Group Sales Office at 206-859-4054. For ages 10 and older.

“Hansel &Gretel”: Pacific Northwest Ballet presents a specially created hourlong performance for children and families based on the classic story of two children lost in the woods who discover a house made of treats and a very un-sweet witch; noon and 3:30 p.m. March 17 and 3:30 p.m. March 23, Marion Oliver McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer St., Seattle Center. Tickets are $25 to $67, $22 to $60 for children 12 and younger. For tickets call 206-441-2424 go online at www.pnb.org, or in person at the PNB Box Office at 301 Mercer St.

“Aladdin”: Directed by artistic director Rose Woods, this Whidbey Children’s Theatre production has a cast of first- through fourth-graders recreating this story about a street urchin and a magic lamp; performances are at various times through March 10 at Whidbey Children’s Theatre, 222 Anthes Ave., Langley. Tickets are $12, $10 and $8; a special family show at 7:30 p.m. March 9 offers all seats at $8. Call 360-221-2282 or email boxoffice.wct@gmail.com.

Exhibits

“Dino Day”: Kids can dress up in dino gear, crack open their own fossils, watch scientists prepare a duck-billed dinosaur fossil, dig for a fossil ichthyosaur in the Dino Dig Pit; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 10, Burke Museum, on the University of Washington campus, at the corner of NE 45th St. and 17th Ave. NE. Admission: $10 general, $8 senior, $7.50 student/youth. Admission is free to children 4 and younger, Burke members, and UW students, faculty and staff. Admission is free to the public on the first Thursday of each month. Call 206-543-5590 or go to www.burkemuseum.org.

“Plastics Unwrapped”: The Burke Museum explores the effect of plastics on people and the planet, from life before plastics to the effects of plastics on our health and the environment today; through May 27 at the Burke Museum, on the University of Washington campus, at the corner of NE 45th St. and 17th Ave. NE. Admission: $10 general, $8 senior, $7.50 student/youth. Admission is free to children 4 and younger, Burke members, and UW students, faculty, and staff. Admission is free to the public on the first Thursday of each month. Call 206-543-5590 or go to www.burkemuseum.org.

Professor Wellbody’s Academy of Health &Wellness: The Pacific Science Center’s new exhibit presents the benefits of being healthy in an interactive way with hands-on inventions, gadgets and activities; Pacific Science Center, 200 Second Ave. N, Seattle. Admission is $27.50, $24.50, $16.50 and $15.50. 206-443-2001, www.pacificsciencecenter.org.

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