Find out what issues matter to you, then vote

Everett Public Library has plenty of books that dig into the current topics at stake in elections.

”You are Mighty: A Guide to Changing the World” by Caroline Paul and illustrated by Lauren Tamaki is the book you can hand to your younger brother or sister who see you getting energized.

”You are Mighty: A Guide to Changing the World” by Caroline Paul and illustrated by Lauren Tamaki is the book you can hand to your younger brother or sister who see you getting energized.

By Carol, Everett Public Library staff

Hey, congratulations on turning 18! You made it through the worst of adolescence and you’re trying out life as an adult. It can be fun and scary, sometimes both at the same time. Discovering what issues are important to you is a big first step into adulthood. And once you figure out what’s important, it’s time to vote.

Yup. I’m that guy bugging you to vote. In Washington State if you’re 18 or will turn 18 by November 6th you can still register to vote in person but you have to act fast — today is the last day! In Snohomish County that means you have until 5pm tonight to get to the county auditor’s office. I promise that getting the ability to vote in this election will be well worth your trouble.

You might be new to this whole adulting thing, but perhaps you’re already a little jaded about politics. I can’t blame you. The last few years have been the most politically chaotic I’ve experienced in my lifetime. But I promise that finding out what’s important to you and where you stand on political issues will help you make informed decisions when it’s time to fill out that ballot.

The Washington State voters’ pamphlet — pick one up at the library if you need one—is your key to the issues and candidates on the ballot. Beyond that, you might have some soul-searching to do. That’s where this reading list comes into play. These books are aimed at young voices looking for something to say and will help you select the best candidates on the ballot that uphold the same priorities and values that you do.

First, let’s dive into the issues. Steal This Country: A Handbook for Resistance, Persistence, and Fixing Almost Everything by Alexandra Styron brings together essays, profiles, and interviews to help you understand the issues and help you determine how you feel about them. From LGBTQIA rights and racial justice to climate change and immigration, this comprehensive book can be your companion as you discover what’s important to you. Be sure to check out the bibliography in the back. It’s divided by topic and lists books, documentaries, articles, and organizations you can seek out to go even more in-depth.

Next, let’s read about what political passion and social activism look like to different people. How I Resist: Activism and Hope for a New Generation edited by Maureen Johnson brings together a diverse and dynamic group of voices that come from all angles: the literary world, entertainment, and political activists. There are essays, interviews, a comic strip, and even sheet music! Together they’ll give you hope and inspiration as you explore the many different ways to raise your voice and be heard.

Girls Resist: A Guide to Activism, Leadership, and Starting a Revolution by KaeLyn Rich may be written expressly for girls, but I’m here to tell you the information inside can be useful to everyone regardless of gender. This book takes the ideas, causes, and issues that are important to you and gives you the framework to take action. Do you want to start a volunteer group? What about a political campaign? Could social media be a way to reach other like-minded folks? And how do you explain all of this to your parents? KaeLyn Rich is an activist who is the Assistant Advocacy Director of the ACLU of New York. She knows just how to break it down.

You are Mighty: A Guide to Changing the World by Caroline Paul and illustrated by Lauren Tamaki is the book you can hand to your younger brother or sister who see you getting energized. Maybe they want to help you with your cause or have a different one of their own. They’re too young to vote but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing they can do to effect change. Some of the tactics discussed, including raising money and boycotting, are tactics you can use too. What better way to feel closer to your siblings than to protest together?

So. Do you feel ready? The truth is even as adults we’re constantly learning new things and over time we can sometimes change our mind. The issues we cared about when we were younger might cease to be important to us or a change in our life may cause us to see the topic from a completely different angle. These books will give you the critical thinking and organizational skills you need to keep up with whatever life throws at you. All that’s left to do is cast your vote.

Visit the Everett Public Library blog for more reviews and news of all things happening at the library.

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