Kit Harington, seen here in character with “Game of Thrones” co-star Emilia Clarke, has entered a $120,000-a-month rehab clinic. (HBO)

Kit Harington, seen here in character with “Game of Thrones” co-star Emilia Clarke, has entered a $120,000-a-month rehab clinic. (HBO)

‘GOT’ star Harrington hits luxury rehab for booze, stress woes

The actor reportedly hit rock bottom when the HBO show finally called it quits.

  • Wednesday, May 29, 2019 9:01am
  • Life

By Christie D’Zurilla / Los Angeles Times

Kit Harington is at a high-end mental health and wellness facility in Connecticut, which he reportedly entered shortly before the “Game of Thrones” finale was broadcast earlier this month.

“Kit has decided to utilize this break in his schedule as an opportunity to spend some time at a wellness retreat to work on some personal issues,” his personal representative told The Times on Tuesday.

The news was first reported by Page Six, which said Harington has been at the Privé-Swiss boutique mental health facility and rehab for a month now, working on stress, exhaustion and alcohol use at an estimated cost of more than $120,000 a month.

The facility’s website notes: “Each retreat is offered to only three clients at a time and includes all one-to-one services with ultra-private luxury accommodations. Our clients are successful individuals who have become derailed by severe depression, anxiety, panic, insomnia, trauma, bipolar, PTSD, addiction/chemical dependency and other mental health challenges.”

“He realized, ‘This is it — this is the end,’” a friend of the actor told Page Six, noting that the end of the HBO series hit Harington hard. “(I)t was something they had all worked so hard on for so many years. He had a moment of, what next?”

The friend said everyone close to Harington wanted him to get some rest after his work on what some have claimed is the greatest TV show in history.

HBO declined to comment when reached Tuesday afternoon.

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