Eat Thai Cuisine’s pad Thai with pork, ground peanuts and bean sprouts. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)

Eat Thai Cuisine’s pad Thai with pork, ground peanuts and bean sprouts. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)

Granite Falls’ long wait is over: Thai food has finally arrived

For 116 years, the town was devoid of a place to enjoy pad Thai. Eat Thai Cuisine has changed all that.

GRANITE FALLS — Culinary history has been made here. For the first time in its 116-year history, the town has a Thai restaurant.

The chance to be the only Thai-food game in town is what lured Nucharee and Tanapol Rungruangsatian to move Eat Thai Cuisine to Granite Falls from Seattle’s posh Queen Anne neighborhood, of all places. They’ve set up shop in the space on E. Stanley Street that was formerly occupied by Barbecue Bucket.

Eat Thai Cuisine is Granite Falls’ first Thai restaurant. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)

Eat Thai Cuisine is Granite Falls’ first Thai restaurant. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)

The Rungruangsatians, who moved to the U.S. from Thailand about 15 years ago, were pleasantly surprised when they opened the doors for the first time. It seems the locals could hardly wait to give Thai food a try.

“Many people were in line,” Nucharee Rungruangsatian said. “We didn’t expect that because it’s a small town.”

My dad, Jim Thompson, joined me for lunch so we could sample Eat Thai’s menu together.

And that menu is huge. There are 34 main dishes from which to choose, from pad see-ew (sauteed noodles with broccoli) to pad kra prow (roasted duck topped with spicy Thai basil sauce), along with more than a dozen soups, salads and appetizers.

The fresh basil rolls are filled with shrimp, noodles, basil and lettuce and served with peanut sauce. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)                                The fresh basil rolls are filled with shrimp, noodles, basil and lettuce and served with peanut sauce. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)

The fresh basil rolls are filled with shrimp, noodles, basil and lettuce and served with peanut sauce. (Evan Thompson / The Herald) The fresh basil rolls are filled with shrimp, noodles, basil and lettuce and served with peanut sauce. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)

We ordered four fresh basil rolls ($12) to start. The rolls are filled with shrimp, noodles, basil and lettuce, and are wrapped in rice paper. The rolls’ filling was nice and crunchy with clean flavors, and there was a delicious peanut sauce for dipping. Dad likened it to eating out of a garden.

Other appetizers to choose from include spring rolls, chicken satay, chicken wings with sweet Thai sauce, fried tofu, calamari and pork stickers.

The main dishes, all $11.95, come with a choice of chicken, pork, beef or tofu. Shrimp or an extra helping of meat cost an additional $3. Every main dish is served with rice, except for noodle dishes.

I ordered another Thai restaurant staple: pad Thai (I chose pork for my protein), ground peanuts, bean sprouts and tamarind sauce.

I’ve had pad Thai in many Thai restaurants, and sometimes the noodles can be dry. Eat Thai’s were not — they were full of flavor that complemented the pork and bean sprouts well. The peanuts served on the side, which I sprinkled on top, were a nice touch.

The crispy chicken dish is slathered in chili paste and served with rice and broccoli. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)

The crispy chicken dish is slathered in chili paste and served with rice and broccoli. (Evan Thompson / The Herald)

I also ordered the crispy chicken slathered in chili paste and served with broccoli. The chicken was true to its name — deep-fried to crispy perfection. It reminded me of the orange chicken I often order at Chinese restaurants.

Dad opted for the garlic stir-fry with broccoli, celery, carrots, garlic cloves and garlic sauce.

“The garlic isn’t overwhelming, which is nice,” he said. “It’s just a nice hint of garlic.”

To top things off, we both ordered Thai iced tea ($3). The drink, made with spiced black tea, sweetened condensed milk and sugar, was like dessert in a glass. Order one, too, if you’re in the mood for a treat.

Evan Thompson: 425-339-3427, ethompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @ByEvanThompson.

If you go

Eat Thai Cuisine, 402 E. Stanley St., Granite Falls, is open 11 a.m. to 8:50 p.m. Monday through Friday and noon to 8:50 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Delivery is available. Call 360-322-7481 or order online at www.eatthaigranitefalls.com.

Talk to us

More in Life

Dave Dodge stands on a speaker while playing his guitar during Nite Wave's show at Tony V's Garage on Saturday, June 8, 2019 in Everett, Wash. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
1980s new wave streams when Bothell cover band performs

Hear Bothell’s own Nite Wave rock out at the “Best ’80s Party Ever!” on Feb. 27 via Facebook.

"Prophets, Teachers and Kings" is a 2020 documentary by Snohomish's John Carswell.
Urban art gets the spotlight at a new Snohomish gallery

The Rosella Gallery features artwork featured in the “Prophets, Teachers and Kings” documentary through March 30.

Barre3 owner Gina Drake leads an exercise class in the Red Barn at 5th Ave S and Maple Street on Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2020 in Edmonds, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Barre3 teaches a fitness trifecta for balance during COVID-19

The full-body workouts combine strength conditioning, cardio and mindfulness to help you feel balanced.

Bourbon mash sits at a distillery in Versailles, Kentucky, on July 26, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Bloomberg photo by Luke Sharrett.
Start your whiskey collection with these 10 bottles

Whether you’re new whiskey game or are a veteran collector, it’s hard to know when to store it or pour it.

A grain bowl with roasted veggies and lemon-garlic salmon is a great way to kick off fish Fridays for Lent. (Gretchen McKay/Post-Gazette/TNS)
Make this zesty lemon-garlic salmon farro bowl for Lent

A grain bowl with roasted veggies and lemon-garlic salmon is a great way to observe fish Fridays for Lent.

Riley Wong, 7, shows his pen pal, Smudge, the picture he drew for her in addition to his letter at Pasado's Safe Haven on Friday, Feb. 19, 2021 in Monroe, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Kids make connections with critters through pen pals program

Pasado’s Safe Haven near Sultan invites children to write to a turkey, a goat, a cow and a rooster.

The 2021 Honda Odyssey minivan has a restyled front end, including the grille, front bumper and LED headlights. (Manufacturer photo)
Functional, practical Honda Odyssey is a favorite among buyers

There’s plenty of room inside this minivan for people, pets and whatnot, and it’s even good in snow.

Can houseplants make you happy? We think so. (Jennifer Bardsley)
A love letter to houseplants during a long and lonely pandemic

A year of social-distancing is like living in a hothouse, but at least her plants provide good company.

Your teenage girl and the negative messages she gives herself

She might benefit from reading “Be True to Yourself: Daily Affirmations and Awesome Advice for Teen Girls.”

Most Read