Kids say the darnedest things about nutrition

  • By Barbara Quinn The Monterey County Herald
  • Monday, May 5, 2014 1:05pm
  • Life

I did not really need a nutrition lesson as I went through security for a flight to visit my family. But the agent was alert to the See’s candy box poking out of my carry-on.

“Uh-oh,” he said with a serious frown. “That’s contraband. I may have to confiscate it.”

For a moment I thought he was serious. Then he smiled and waved me through. Very funny.

Once in the air on this early morning flight, I welcomed a glass of orange juice offered by the attendant. An hour later, she came through the cabin with cups of water.

“One cup for every hour of altitude,” she reminded us. Guess she’s right. We need more fluids to prevent dehydration when we are up high — even in pressurized planes.

I texted my daughter when we landed in Denver. She texted back, “Elways restaurant in the A concourse is a good place to grab a mimosa and breakfast.”

Very tempting, but at this time of the day, coffee was on the agenda more than champagne and orange juice.

And in case I need to justify my love of java, recent findings confirm an interesting yet unexplained association between increased coffee intake (both caffeinated and decaf) and a decreased risk for type 2 diabetes.

I glanced at my boarding pass for the connecting flight to … BFF? Nope, not “Best Friends Forever” but the airport code for Scotts Bluff, Nebraska. And away we went.

So as I settle into official Grammy duty this week, I am most amazed at the nutrition lessons I’ve learned from my almost 2-year-old granddaughter.

“Eat your blueberries, Grammy!” she reminded me one morning as she alternately popped one in her mouth and offered one to me.

This kiddo asks for milk instead of soda. She sits up and eats at the table with her family. And she requests, “S’cuse me, pweese,” when she is finished.

I made her a mini turkey sandwich for lunch and sliced some cucumbers on the side, just to see what she’d do.

“Mmmm … crunchy!” she declared. “I wike cucumbers!”

I’m observing first-hand what experts call “feeding dynamics” or the “trust” approach to feeding kids. Moms and dads and other caregivers provide a variety of foods to children at fairly structured meal and snack times.

They eat with their children in designated areas. And they keep the eating atmosphere pleasant.

In this setting, say child experts, children learn to be responsible for what and how much food they eat. They are encouraged but not forced to try new flavors and textures. And they develop the ability to self-regulate their intake as they grow.

Sit on the stool to eat your snack, I reminded Frances today.

“Great idea!” she said as she climbed up to eat her cheese and raspberries.

Later she asks, “More raspberries, pweese?”

I place a few more on her plate.

“Thank-ewe!” she says.

Barbara Quinn is a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at the Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula.

Talk to us

More in Life

A glorious example of Gothic architecture, Reims Cathedral's construction began in 1211. Around the back of the church, flying buttresses are hard at work, supporting the massive structure.
Rick Steves’ Europe: Bubbly, historic Reims: The toast of France’s Champagne country

Imagine that happy day around 1700 when the monk Dom Pérignon, after much fiddling with the double fermentation of his grape juice, stumbled onto a bubbly delight.

When to get professional help for your child

Here are some of the signs that a consultation with a mental health expert is in order.

Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives are slated to perfom June 13 at Edmonds Center for the Arts. (Associated Press)
Music, theater and more: What’s happening in Snohomish County

Country star Marty Stuart and his band, the Fabulous Superlatives, are performing in Edmonds on June 13.

Fishy experience at a bar in Istanbul ends up in a $7,853 charge

Nicholas Butler is robbed by criminals who prey on tourists. Will Wells Fargo step up and help him undo the charges?

Dolly Hunnicutt holds onto a metal raccoon cutout while looking through metal wildflowers at the Freeborn Metal Art booth during the first day of Sorticulture on Friday, June 9, 2023 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Sorticulture brings gardening galore, fun by the bushel at 130 booths

“Every year there’s something different to see,” one attendee said at the opening of the three-day festival in downtown Everett.

Photo by Patricia Guthrie   This old medicine bottle from Lee’s Pharmacy in Seattle was found in the dirt outside the log cabin.
A long-hidden cabin emerges from the mists of time on Whidbey

Demolition of a dilapidated farmhouse in Langley reveals an entombed log cabin that might be 150 years old.

Multiple signs at Boxcar Park alert park users to a ban on kites at the park “effective immediately” on Wednesday, June 7, 2023 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Everett’s Boxcar Park cuts strings with kite flyers due to power lines

Safety is the reason for the ban at the park with the perfect breeze for kite flying.

People begin parading down First Street with a giant balloon “PRIDE” during Snohomish’s inaugural Pride celebration on Saturday, June 3, 2023, in downtown Snohomish, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Your guide to Pride in Snohomish County

Mark your calendars; Pride Month is upon us.

Twin sisters Lyndsay Lamb (left) and Leslie Davis (right), co-hosts of HGTV's Unsellable Houses. (Photo provided)
Meet and greet HGTV’s ‘Unsellable Houses’ twin sister stars in Snohomish on Friday

Lyndsay Lamb and Leslie Davis have made Lamb & Co. a #twinwin home-selling, home-goods brand.

Most Read