Quinoa and vegetable egg bites — it’s the kind of recipe that could help a resolution stick. (Photo by Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post)

Quinoa and vegetable egg bites — it’s the kind of recipe that could help a resolution stick. (Photo by Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post)

Make-ahead egg muffins for a delicious, on-the-go breakfast

These mini fritattas are packed with hearty quinoa and colorful sauteed vegetables.

Whether or not you are into making official resolutions, chances are you are shifting toward eating healthier this time of year. A popular and worthy aim is to start the day with a good breakfast. Doing so not only gives you the nourishment you need to fuel your morning, it tends to set the tone for the day.

These tasty three-bite egg cups are designed to put those breakfast goals within easy reach, even considering the mad rush reality of weekday mornings. Made in a muffin tin, they are like loaded mini-frittatas, packed with the hearty whole grain quinoa and colorful sauteed vegetables — including red bell pepper, fresh spinach and mushrooms — and seasoned with savory onion, garlic, smoked paprika and Parmesan cheese.

Make them up to three days ahead and store in the refrigerator. A quick 60 to 90 seconds in the microwave and these bites are ready, though they’re equally good at room temperature. In an ideal world you’d sit down at an actual table for five minutes and savor these portable cups, but they can also be eaten on the go if need be as you dash out the door.

Delicious and practical, it’s the kind of recipe that could help a resolution stick.

Quinoa and vegetable egg bites

These savory three-bite egg cups, packed with hearty quinoa and colorful sauteed vegetables and baked in a muffin tin, are like loaded mini-frittatas. Seasoned with smoked paprika and Parmesan cheese, each bite packs bold flavor. Make them ahead, so they are at the ready to reheat, or eat at room temperature for a speedy and nourishing breakfast on the go.

Note: You will need about ⅓ cup uncooked quinoa to get to 1 cup cooked. If you want less smoky-tasting bites, start with ½ teaspoon of smoked paprika and add more, if desired.

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 small yellow onion, diced

1 red bell pepper, diced

4 ounces portobello or cremini mushrooms, coarsely chopped

¾ teaspoon kosher salt

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon smoked paprika

3 cups packed (3 ounces) fresh spinach, coarsely chopped

6 large eggs

1 cup cooked, cooled quinoa, preferably red

⅓ cup (1 ounce) grated Parmesan cheese

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees with the rack in the middle. Line a 12-muffin tin with paper liners. Spray the inside of each liner with cooking oil spray.

In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, heat the olive oil until shimmering. Add the onion, pepper, mushrooms and ¼ teaspoon salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables have softened, their water has evaporated, and they begin to brown, about 8 minutes. Stir in the garlic and paprika and cook, stirring, for an additional 30 seconds. Add the spinach and cook, stirring, until wilted. Remove the pan from the heat and let cool slightly.

In a large bowl, whisk the eggs. Stir in the cooked vegetables, quinoa, Parmesan cheese, the remaining ½ teaspoon salt and the pepper.

Using a ⅓ cup measure, distribute the mixture evenly among the muffin cups. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes, until set in the center. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes 6 servings. Nutrition per serving: 190 calories; 11 grams total fat; 3 grams saturated fat; Cholesterol: 220 milligrams cholesterol; 290 milligrams sodium; 12 grams carbohydrates; 2 grams dietary fiber; 2 grams sugar.

Talk to us

More in Life

Washington’s most beloved state park turns 100

Deception Pass State Park, which draws as many visitors as the best-known national parks in the U.S., celebrates a century of recreation and conservation

Hydrangea and rose
July checklist for Snohomish County gardeners

After a slow start to summer, things should take off this month. So keep planting and nurturing.

Caption: The 12 week Edmonds Community Police Academy was a free opportunity for private citizens to learn about law enforcement.
An inside look at how law enforcement works

A pregnant mother. A man who rescues abused horses and donkeys. A… Continue reading

Kid 'n Play members Christopher "Kid" Reid, left, and Christopher "Play" Martin perform on NBC's "Today" show during the "I Love The 90's" morning concert at Rockefeller Plaza on Friday, April 29, 2016, in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)
Music, theater and more: What’s happening in Snohomish County

Relive the music of the 1990s with Kid N Play and other stars of the era at the Tulalip Casino Amphitheater.

So-called relaxing summer vacations can wear you out

To truly enjoy a family getaway, tone down your expectations. Everything won’t be picture-perfect.

Gimmelwald, built in an avalanche zone, yet specializing in alpine tranquility.
Roaming the Alps brings cultural insights along with the views

The Swiss have great respect for Alpine traditions and culture — and contempt for tourists who disrespect both.

Will TripMate cover costs for trip canceled for medical reasons?

After Stanley Wales cancels his diving trip to Bonaire, he files a travel insurance claim with TripMate. What’s taking them so long to respond?

Contestant chef Brian Madayag (left) of Edmonds and West Coast team captain Brooke Williamson on “Beachside Brawl.” (Food Network) 20220616
Edmonds chef reps Pacific Northwest on new Food Network show

Barkada owner Brian Madayaga will compete on a new Food Network series that premiers Sunday.

Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Kosteri’ (Richie Steffen)
Great Plant Pick: Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Kosteri’

This Hinoki cypress is graceful and beautiful, and is very drought-tolerant once established.

Photo Caption: Butter prints like this one pressed a design into freshly made butter as a decoration or for marketing. Today, collectors search for antique butter prints and consider them folk art.
19th century farm families’ butter prints are coveted folk art

One example with a flower-and-heart design recently sold at auction for more than $5,000.

After two years of wellness, Covid finally hit this family, but thanks to vaccinations, the symptoms were mild. (Jennifer Bardsley)
Jennifer Bardsley’s fighting COVID-19 with vaccines and TLC

But even with vaccinations, the disease is scary for people like her with less than robust immune systems.

Turkey vultures’ pervious nostrils are among the features that help them feed on carrion. (The Columbian files)
In praise of turkey vultures, nature’s cleaning service

These raptors should be revered, not reviled, for their disposal of stinky, disease-laden animal matter.