Ian Terry / The Herald

Skunk cabbage, also known as a swamp lantern, emerges from the wetlands of the Northwest Stream Center in Everett on Wednesday, March 7. The Adopt A Stream Foundation will be presenting their annual Swamp Lantern Festival from March 15 through April 21 to give visitors a chance to see the plants in full bloom.

Photo taken on 03072018

Outdoors classes and activities around Snohomish County

The listings include Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest updates and REI Lynnwood workshops.

Events listed here are contingent on whether each jurisdiction is approved to enter the corresponding phase of the governor’s four-phase reopening plan. Events may be canceled or postponed. Check with each venue for the latest information.

Hiking with your pup: REI presents a “How to Hike Safely With Your Dog” webinar with Washington’s Recreate Responsibly Coalition at 7 p.m. April 28 via Zoom. Experts with the Washington Trails Association, King County Search Dogs and the Washington State Animal Response Team will share tools and tricks for raising hiking pups and keeping your furry friends safe on trail. Learn how to find dog-friendly trails, how to train your pup on trail etiquette, and what to look out for to help keep your doggo safe outdoors. A Zoom link will be emailed to you with registration. More at www.rei.com.

Swamp Lantern Festival: The Northwest Stream Center’s festival, running through April 30, celebrates the coming of spring outdoors. There will be an expanse of the Pacific Northwest’s first spring flowers, including skunk cabbage (also known as swamp lantern), mock orange nicco and Indian plum. Admission is $7 for adults over 18, $6 for seniors, $5 for students and $3 for EBT cardholders. Children younger than 5 and Adopt a Stream Foundation members have free entry. The center is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. Reservations are required. Call 425-316-8592 or go to www.streamkeeper.org.

Outdoor Speaker Series: Pickleball master and instructor Rick Bomar will talk about America’s fastest growing sport from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. May 11 at the Marysville Opera House, 1225 Third St., Marysville. “Pickleball Rick” will talk about how pickleball is different than tennis, badminton and ping-pong, and guide you on how to get started playing it yourself. Doors open at 6 p.m. Cost is $5 with online registration or at the door if space is still available. More at www.marysvillewa.gov or 360-363-8400.

Outfitting at home: You can now make a free virtual outfitting appointment with an Alderwood REI expert on May 12 via Microsoft Teams. Whether you are interested in exploring a new outdoor activity, want to get the next great piece of gear or advice for an upcoming adventure, an outfitting expert from the Alderwood store is available to help from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. Registration is required. A Microsoft Teams link will be emailed to you after you book your appointment. More at www.rei.com.

Get wild: Reversing global warming is possible — and you have an important role to play in that process. The Camano Wildlife Habitat Project, sponsored by Friends of Camano Island Parks, hosts presentations the third Wednesday of the month. The next presentation, “Reversing Global Warming: Introduction to Project Drawdown is set for 7 p.m. May 19 via Zoom. Scott Henson, the author of “Drawdown Seattle” will talk about a comprehensive plan to reverse global warming from Project Drawdown — a scientific study that identified 100 solutions that together, could actually reverse global warming by 2050. A Zoom link will be emailed to you with registration. Call 360-387-2236 or go to www.camanowildlifehabitat.org.

Free park-ing: The next day of the year to visit Washington state parks in 2021 without an entrance fee is June 5 (National Trails Day). Other free parks days are June 12 (National Get Outdoors Day), June 13 (Fishing Day), Aug. 25 (National Park Service’s 105th birthday), Sept. 25 (National Public Lands Day), Nov. 11 (Veterans Day) and Nov. 26 (Autumn Day). More at www.discoverpass.wa.gov.

Find your favorite park: Still playing it safe? Virtually explore Washington’s state parks during the pandemic. Washington State Parks Foundation’s website features an interactive map of Washington’s 124 state parks, as well as virtual tours, park information and trip reports. The virtual tours provide a 360-degree view with navigational tools and a walk-through of state parks, trails, campgrounds, retreat centers, interpretive centers and vacation houses. More at www.waparks.org.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Outdoors” to features@heraldnet.com.

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