Sno-Isle Libraries presents “Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest” with mushroom expert Daniel Winkler on Sept. 15 via Zoom. (Getty Images)
Sno-Isle Libraries presents “Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest” with mushroom expert Daniel Winkler on Sept. 15 via Zoom. (Getty Images)

Sno-Isle Libraries presents “Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest” with mushroom expert Daniel Winkler on Sept. 15 via Zoom. (Getty Images) Sno-Isle Libraries presents “Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest” with mushroom expert Daniel Winkler on Sept. 15 via Zoom. (Getty Images)

Outdoors classes and activities around Snohomish County

The listings include Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest updates and REI Lynnwood workshops.

Outdoor Speaker Series: Motorcyclist and author Ryan Repenn will talk his book “50 States of Denial: A Motorcycle Memoir” from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Sept. 14 at the Marysville Opera House, 1225 Third St., Marysville. Repenn will share his motorcycle adventures across every state in America while battling a form of paraplegia that affects his ability to walk. The Outdoor Speaker Series is held on second Tuesdays, January through May and September through November. Doors open at 6 p.m. Cost is $5 at the door. More at www.marysvillewa.gov or 360-363-8400.

Mushrooms: The Pacific Northwest is the region richest in edible mushroom in the Western hemisphere. Sno-Isle Libraries presents a talk with mushroom expert Daniel Winkler at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 15 via Zoom. Winkler will help you to get to know, identify and find these wonderful mushrooms while steering you clear of dangerous look-a-likes. You will be advised how to properly collect, carefully transport, safely prepare and reliably store your mushrooms. Winkler is the author of a multitude of field guides to edible mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest. A Zoom link to the event will be emailed after registration. More at www.sno-isle.org.

Snohomish River kayak tour: Paddle the Snohomish River to gain a fresh perspective on the surrounding ecosystem. No experience necessary. Kayak tours are noon to 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 to 6 p.m. Sept. 15 and Sept. 17 at Cady Park, 40 Maple Ave., Snohomish. Harbor seals, river otters, salmon, and bald eagles are common sightings. All equipment provided by REI. Single kayaks will be used for this tour; tandem kayaks will be optional for members of the same household. Cost is $79 for members, $99 for non-members. More at www.rei.com.

Urban nature: Even in the most urban of areas, nature is there; we just have to change our perspective. The Everett Public Library presents a talk with the author of “Nature Obscura: A City’s Hidden Natural World” at 6 p.m. Sept. 16 via Crowdcast. A naturalist, Kelly Brenner will share the secrets to finding your own diverse and wild neighbors from park to rooftop and everything in between. Register for the free talk at www.crowdcast.io/e/brenner. Call 425-257-8000 or go to www.epls.org for more information.

Wilderness first aid: If you work at wilderness camps, enjoy weekend family outdoor activities or recreate outdoors, this course is for you. REI is hosting a “Wilderness First Aid” class taught by the National Leadership Outdoor School from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 17-26 at Gold Creek County Park, 16020 148th Ave NE, Woodinville. Be prepared for hands-on instruction on wilderness medicine over the course of two days. You’ll earn your Wilderness First Aid certification with completion of the class. There is a waitlist. Cost is $245 for members, $275 for non-members. Go to www.rei.com for more information.

Green Everett: The next Green Everett Partnership work party is from 9 to 11 a.m. Sept. 18 at Forest Park, 205 Park Road, Everett. Help improve Everett’s parks and natural areas by removing invasive species, planting trees and maintaining plants. The Green Everett Partnership is a collaboration between the city parks department and Forterra, formerly the Cascade Land Conservancy. Call 425-238-0065 or go to www.greeneverett.org.

Snohomish Tweed Ride: Fancy a cycle along the Centennial Trail while sporting your finest turn-of-the-century apparel? No modern garb allowed. Meet on Sept. 18 at 9:30 a.m. at the historic Machias Depot, 1626 Virginia St. This year’s stop for tea and biscuits (bring your own cup), photo ops and a treasure hunt will be at the Blackman House Museum, 118 Avenue B. Ride back to Machias at 2:30 p.m. from the historic Carnegie Library, 105 Cedar Ave. More at www.historicdowntownsnohomish.org.

Free park-ing: The next day of the year to visit Washington state parks in 2021 without an entrance fee is Sept. 25 (National Public Lands Day). Other free parks days are Nov. 11 (Veterans Day) and Nov. 26 (Autumn Day). More at www.discoverpass.wa.gov.

Return of the Salmon Celebration: The festival is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 25 at Osprey Park, 801 First St., Sultan. Features riverside tours, drumming, cedar weaving, dancing, horse-drawn wagon rides and fish hatchery tour. Kids get to release a fish from the hatchery into the river. More at www.skyvalleychamber.com.

Fall leaves kayak tour: Paddle to the Snohomish River’s most picturesque spots to see the color-changing leaves. No experience necessary. Kayak tours are 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sept. 25 and Sept. 30 at Cady Park, 40 Maple Ave., Snohomish. All equipment provided by REI. Single kayaks will be used for this tour; tandem kayaks will be optional for members of the same household. Cost is $79 for members, $99 for non-members. More at www.rei.com.

The Banff Film Festival: REI presents 2021’s Banff Film Festival World Tour, a virtual presentation of short films and documentaries about mountain culture, sports and the environment. There are two film programs (each two hours long) available for streaming via Now! — Amber and Onyx. Tickets are $15 for one, or $28 for both programs. You have three days to watch one program; 14 days if you sign up for both. Films streamable through Oct. 21. Register at filmfest.banffcentre.ca/?campaign=WT-152515. Call 425-640-6200 or go to www.rei.com for more information.

Hiking recommendations: Let the Washington Trails Association suggest your next hike. WTA’s website features a tool that offers personalized suggestions of hikes you might want to add to your to-do list. The tool is designed to educate, spark curiosity and shift focus from a small number of often-recommended trails to the many trails that Washington has to offer. Find the hike recommender tool at wta.org/recommender. More at www.wta.org.

Find your favorite park: Washington State Parks Foundation’s website features an interactive map of Washington’s 124 state parks, as well as virtual tours, park information and trip reports. The virtual tours provide a 360-degree view with navigational tools and a walk-through of state parks, trails, campgrounds, retreat centers, interpretive centers and vacation houses. More at www.waparks.org.

Email event information for this calendar with the subject “Outdoors” to features@heraldnet.com.

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