In a 2016 photo, musician Paul Simon performs during the Global Citizen Festival in New York. Simon wraps up his farewell concert tour Saturday at a park in Queens, a bicycle ride across the borough from where he grew up. The 76-year-old singer picked Flushing Meadows Corona Park to say goodbye, an outdoor show on the first night of autumn. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

In a 2016 photo, musician Paul Simon performs during the Global Citizen Festival in New York. Simon wraps up his farewell concert tour Saturday at a park in Queens, a bicycle ride across the borough from where he grew up. The 76-year-old singer picked Flushing Meadows Corona Park to say goodbye, an outdoor show on the first night of autumn. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

Paul Simon wraps up farewell tour back home

He seems eager for freedom, his biographer said. Also, he actually hates the “Feelin’ Groovy” song.

  • Saturday, September 22, 2018 9:50am
  • Life

By David Bauder / Associated Press

NEW YORK — Paul Simon wraps up his farewell concert tour Saturday night at a park in Queens, a bicycle ride across the borough from where he grew up.

The 76-year-old singer picked Flushing Meadows Corona Park to say goodbye, an outdoor show on the first night of autumn. The setlist at recent stops has ranged from his first 1960s hit with ex-partner Art Garfunkel, “The Sound of Silence,” to selections from a disc released weeks ago.

Simon isn’t retiring, and hasn’t ruled out occasional future performances. But he’s said this is his last time out on the road, and he isn’t alone among his peers; Elton John and Kiss are also doing goodbye swings.

A staple of the folk-rock scene with Garfunkel, Simon explored music from around the world as a solo artist, most notably “Graceland” and its African influences. His recent work has been his most musically challenging, and in his new disc he revisits overlooked songs from the past four decades. He’s a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member for both stages of his career.

The return to New York raised memories of Simon’s two iconic shows in Manhattan’s Central Park, in 1981 with Garfunkel and in 1991 on his own. He played two nights in Madison Square Garden earlier this week.

An often dour performer, Simon has been animated and talkative during the final shows. He seems eager for the freedom that awaits him, said Robert Hilburn, who wrote the biography “Paul Simon: A Life” that was released this spring.

“The thing that strikes me is that he’s been happy, relieved,” Hilburn said. “There’s a burden off of him.”

During an earlier show in Portland, Oregon, Simon playfully “penalized” himself for flubbing the lyrics to one song by singing an old Simon & Garfunkel hit he confessed to hating: “The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy).”

Talk to us

More in Life

Get to the nursery soon to find some ‘fall color in a can’

Thanks to our hot and dry summer, a selection of plants are already starting to sport their autumn apparel.

New sculpture rises above Everett’s arboretum at Legion Park

“We Rise,” by Everett sculptor Constance Jones, honors Zonta Club of Everett’s 90 years of service to women.

Live-stream concert to offer ‘fresh vibes’ during pandemic

Zimbabwean-American musician ZNi International’s show will benefit Work2BeWell, a mental health initiative.

Egg cup frame made of sterling silver is over 200 years old

An English breakfast could be served with very fancy and expensive dishes and silver serving pieces.

Great Plant Pick: Malus ‘Adirondack’, flowering crabapple

This Donald Egolf selection is one of the most profusely flowered of all crabapple cultivars.

Amid pandemic, seniors have second thoughts on where to live

Some decide against communal living in retirement communities, and commit to staying in their own homes as long as possible.

Lemon Mascarpone Layer Cake, photographed Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020. (Hillary Levin/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS)
These 4 recipes will prevent the heartbreak of blah desserts

Each of them is decadent and well worth the calories, and they’ll all become your new favorites.

A man walks past a free flu shot advertisement outside of a drugstore on August 19, 2020 in New York. (Photo by BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)
Q&A: Who should get the flu vaccine, and when?

Flu shots won’t prevent COVID-19, but it’s still important for everybody to be vaccinated, doctors say.

How to find a healthy ‘normal’ during life’s transitions

Avoiding gaps in self-care requires planning and thoughtfulness. Here are some tips from a doctor.

Most Read