Ride your bike to an explosive Seattle view on July 4

  • Friday, June 27, 2008 11:14pm
  • Life

Watching fireworks on Independence Day can be a stationary activity. Sit on your blanket. See things explode.

To kick it into gear, consider riding your bike into Seattle via the paved trailways in Snohomish and King counties this Fourth of July.

The Sammamish River Trail runs through Bothell, connecting to the Burke-Gilman Trail, one of King County’s most heavily travelled routes.

Using the two, riders can coast along an unbroken path all the way to Gas Works Park for one of Seattle’s biggest fireworks displays.

Granted, taking the trail has some drawbacks. The ride may take longer on the holiday. Also, when you arrive at the park, you have to manage a bike in throngs of spectators.

Still, riding your bike can help you save gas money and get some exercise.

While the trail itself runs more than 18 miles, the portion between Bothell and Gas Works Park is about 12 miles, Seattle cycling writer Bill Thorness said.

“It’s very flat,” Thorness said, calling it an easy ride. “There’s a lot of tree roots that have heaved up the asphalt in some areas. Going through Lake Forest Park there are a number of stop signs and cross streets.”

Thorness said the ride might take 90 minutes or longer from Bothell, so pace yourself. The fireworks begin at dusk.

You can get onto the trail near the Park at Bothell Landing, 9929 NE 180th St., Bothell; at Wilmot Gateway Park, 17301 131st Ave. NE, Woodinville; or at Log Boom Park, off Bothell Way at 60th Place NE, Kenmore.

Andy Rathbun, Herald Writer, arathbun@heraldnet.com, 425-339-3455

BIKING AT NIGHT TIPS

Here are some tips on biking the trails from Bill Thorness, author of “Biking Puget Sound.”

Let there be light: Use your tail light when on city streets, your headlight at all times, and your bicycle bell around pedestrians and other riders.

No glaring: When riding at night on a crowded trail, not a street, turn off your tail light; the glare harms visibility for cyclists behind you.

Points of light: Tilt your headlight down at night to better illuminate the trail in front of you.

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