The Hendrie House, built in 1902, is one of the homes on Sunday’s Snohomish Historical Society home tour. (Kevin Clark / The Herald) 
                                The Hendrie house, built in 1902, is one of the homes on Sunday’s historic homes tour. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

The Hendrie House, built in 1902, is one of the homes on Sunday’s Snohomish Historical Society home tour. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Snohomish tour features 117-year-old Foursquare-style home

The Hendrie House is one of six stops on this year’s Snohomish Historical Society’s tour.

If you’re a fan of the annual Snohomish home tour, you’ll fancy a peek inside a 1902 Foursquare-style home during Sunday’s event.

The Hendrie House, owned by Candace Jarrett and David Cordell, was constructed by H.P. Hansen, one of a number of homes he built in Snohomish. “They’re beautiful Foursquares,” Jarrett said.

It’s one of six homes on this year’s tour, most of which are in the city’s historic district, said Chris Gee, president of the Snohomish Historical Society.

Husband and wife moved into the home six years ago, which has an accompanying large garage, part of the renovations to the property by previous owners.

“It really is so handsome,” Jarrett said. “Every guy and gal who loves cars wants to see the garage.”

Alas, it won’t be open as part of Sunday’s home tour. But the sage gray house, named for pioneers George and Caroline “Car” Hendrie, will be. The Chinese chestnut tree in the yard is from the Hendries’ former home in New England.

Jarrett and Cordell toured the home in the 1990s, years before they bought it in 2013. With two small children, they didn’t have the time to invest in a major remodel of the home. Over some 15 years, that project was undertaken by the owners they eventually bought the house from, Kathy Allison Prince and Greg Prince.

“Oh, it’s just a wonderful house, it really is,” Jarrett said, adding that it still has its original windows.

The biggest change made they made to it was adding a patio to the front of the house. Inside, the floors, once covered in carpet, were stripped to show off their original fir wood.

The couple also added amber tile around the fireplace on the main floor, with its adjoining dining room, living room, kitchen, sunroom, pantry and powder room.

Upstairs are three bedrooms, one of which will be open for the tour.

The home represents a sort of homecoming for Jarrett, who grew up in Snohomish and graduated from Snohomish High School.

She has been refinishing furniture for years, and the house displays some of those projects, including barrister bookcases, rocking chairs and a French hutch.

The house was formerly occupied by the mother of Earl Torgeson, a major league baseball player from Snohomish.

Another house on the tour is believed to be built in the 1940s byFlorence Swandt, a cook at Snohomish High School and who owned a local cafe.

“Why I bring that up is because the kitchen for being built in the 1940s is kind of state-of-the-art,” said Renee Deierling.

Alice Deierling, the grandmother of her husband, Dell Deierling, moved into the home in 1972 and lived there until January 1996. Renee and her husband moved into the home in May 1996, following Alice Deierling’s death at age 95.

The home is made of clear cedar siding and has oak floors. It has boiler-based steam heating. One door is accessed by its original skeleton key.

The home was on the Christmas Parlour Tour in 2008, also sponsored by the local historical society.

One of Renee Deierling’s favorite things about the home is its large picture windows with views of the Cascade range.

“It’s the new house on the block, but old by today’s standards,” she said.

Sharon Salyer: 425-339-3486 or salyer@heraldnet.com.

If you go

The Snohomish Historical Society’s annual home tour is from noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 15. General admission is $15, $12 for seniors and children. Tickets are available in downtown Snohomish at McDaniel’s Do It Center, 510 Second St., Joyworks, 1002 First St., and Annie’s On First, 1122 First St. Tickets also will be sold the day of the tour at the Waltz building at 116 Ave. B. Call 360-568-5235 or go to tinyurl.com/SnoHomeTour for more information.

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