Snoop Dog, Wiz Khalifa bring joint interest to Seattle on Saturday

  • By Andy Rathbun Herald Writer
  • Wednesday, April 16, 2014 6:25pm
  • LifeGo-See-Do

Snoop Dogg and Wiz Khalifa may be 15 years apart in age, but they have one common love: weed.

The rappers, who co-headline the WaMu Theater at 9 p.m. Saturday, both have crafted their images around smoking out.

As the senior among them, Snoop blazed a trail, so to speak, for Khalifa. After making a splash with Dr. Dre in the early 1990s, Snoop saw his debut album, “Doggystyle,” debut at No. 1 in 1993. Since then, he’s played the part of a laid-back bad boy, a rapper whose blunt image has made him a pop icon.

Wiz Khalifa is newer to the game, but is treading similar ground. His own major label debut, “Rolling Papers,” debuted at No. 2 in 2011. A string of hits followed, and his sophomore effort, “O.N.I.F.C.” bowed at No. 2 as well.

Tickets to the see the pair are $58.15 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

Ellie Goulding also hits Seattle in the coming days, playing the Paramount Theatre at 7 p.m. Wednesday.

The English-born singer’s sleekly produced electro-pop has made her a star on both sides of the Atlantic. Goulding’s first album, “Lights,” was a huge hit in Britain, while its eponymous single reached No. 1 in the United States in 2012.

Her sophomore effort, “Halcyon,” pushed her sound further into the atmosphere. She was rewarded with a still-bigger audience, both here and at home.

Tickets are $43.75 at stgpresents.org or 877-784-4849.

Franz Ferdinand are making a visit to Seattle from the United Kingdom as well, with the Scottish indie rockers playing the Showbox SoDo at 8 p.m. Thursday.

Franz Ferdinand is best known for a decade-old hit, “Take Me Out,” which made a splash with its huge guitar hooks and slinky vocals in 2004.

The durable group has since released three more albums that, thanks to strong songwriting and a loyal following, have kept Franz Ferdinand albums on the charts despite the lack of a new signature single.

The band is now touring behind its 2013 album, “Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action,” which hit No. 4 on the rock charts last year.

Tickets are $34 at showboxonline.com or 888-929-7849.

Rowdy alt-country rockers Drive By-Truckers will play the Showbox SoDo one night earlier, at 8 p.m. Wednesday.

The group got its start in Athens, Ga., making its opening statement in 1998 with the debut album “Ganstabilly.” Since then, the band has both satirized and celebrated Southern culture on albums such as “The Dirty South” and “The Big To-Do.”

The group is touring now behind its latest record, “English Oceans,” which hit No. 16 on the Billboard 200 in March.

Tickets are $26.50 at showboxonline.com or 888-929-7849.

Finally, Switchfoot will return to Seattle for a concert at the Showbox at 8:30 Friday night.

A Grammy-winning band, Switchfoot is a bit like U2 by way of a surfboard shop. Like U2, the group has churned out a steady stream of alt-rock hits since 2004 that have explored the group’s Christian faith amid big guitars and mild sonic experimentations.

The San Diego-based band is touring now behind “Fading West,” a record that found the group exploring some new spaces with its sound without forgetting to include some pop hooks.

Tickets are $28 at showboxonline.com or 888-929-7849.

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