The Maxwell Quartet, from Scotland, will perform Feb. 1 as part of Everett Civic Music’s 2019-20 season. (The Maxwell Quartet)

The Maxwell Quartet, from Scotland, will perform Feb. 1 as part of Everett Civic Music’s 2019-20 season. (The Maxwell Quartet)

Variety is key for Everett Civic Music’s seven-show season

The lineup includes a Croatian superstar, a Scottish strings quartet and a Beach Boys tribute band.

Everett Civic Music’s 2019-2020 season includes performances that allow audiences to experience music from around the world.

The season kicks off with guitarists Loren (Barrigar) and Mark (Mazengarb) on Saturday afternoon. Mazengarb, from New Zealand, first performed with Barrigar in 2010 at the Chet Atkins Appreciation Society’s annual convention. He now performs full time with Barrigar.

Barrigar began playing guitar at age 4. Songs he has written have been heard on television shows, including “ER.” His most recent album, released in 2009, is called “Chillaxin’.”

Laurene Kitchen, a 12-year volunteer with Everett Civic Music, said the duo has a diverse repertoire, including Americana, classical, bluegrass and Gypsy-style jazz.

The next concert, on Oct. 19, features Tatiana “Tajci” Cameron. The Croatian-born singer performs with her sister, Sanya Mateyas, who also sings, and keyboardist Brian Hanson.

Tajci was “a pop superstar in her country by the time she was 19,” Kitchen said.

Tajci moved to the United States when she was 21 and went on to graduate from the American Musical and Dramatic Academy in New York City. She performs a variety of genres, including pop, jazz, country and spiritual.

The Rice Brothers, with Johnny and Chris Rice, will perform Nov. 17. The two brothers both play piano and cello, Kitchen said. “They do classical, gospel, jazz, ragtime and boogie woogie,” she said.

“We like that type of thing. Some people don’t want a whole classical concert, and some may not want a whole concert of boogie woogie. That’s what we look for — people who have a variety of offerings.”

The first concert of the new year is on Feb. 1. The Maxwell Quartet — Colin Scobie, George Smith, Elliot Perks and Duncan Strachan — are from Glasgow, Scotland.

They will play selections from Beethoven, Hyden and an original arrangement of Scottish folk music.

Next up, surf’s up. On Feb. 16, Sail On, a Beach Boys tribute band, is scheduled.

Band members Wyatt Funderburk, Paul Runyon, Matt Thompson, Jason Brewer, Carling Shatzman and Mike Williamson have been performing together since 2017.

Sons of Serendip is scheduled on March 28, a group Kitchen calls “an extraordinary quartet,” combining the sounds of harp, piano, cello and voice. The four friends began performing in 2014. They were finalists on season nine of “America’s Got Talent.”

The season wraps up on April 18 with the Harry James Orchestra, led by Fred Radke.

Radke played with Harry James and took over the group when James retired, Kitchen said. The orchestra specializes in big band music from the 1940s to the ‘80s, she said.

Everett Civic Music was formed in 1931, originally scheduling classical music performances. Over the years, it has transitioned to offer a variety of programming.

“We try to make it all family friendly,” Kitchen said.

Sharon Salyer 425-339-3486 or salyer@heraldnet.com.

If you go

Tickets for Everett Civic Music’s 2019-2020 season are bought as a package for all seven performances. The price is $60 for adults and $20 for youth. All performances are at 2 p.m. at the Everett Civic Auditorium, 2415 Colby Ave. No tickets for single performances avaiable.

Tickets may be purchased by check only. Go to www.everettcivicmusic.org/order-form.html and print out the form and mail it with a check to: Everett Civic Music, PO Box 12384, Mill Creek WA 98082. Tickets will be mailed back to you.

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