Lisbon’s trolleys can get unbearably crowded, so have a plan if you want to ride one. (Rick Steves’ Europe)

Lisbon’s trolleys can get unbearably crowded, so have a plan if you want to ride one. (Rick Steves’ Europe)

What’s new for travelers in Spain and Portugal for 2019

It’s important to travel with the latest information to get the most out of your experience.

Like many travelers, last spring I visited Barcelona dreaming of seeing Antoni Gaudi’s breathtaking Sagrada Familia church. When I got there, the ticket office was closed, with a posted sign: “No more tickets today. Buy your ticket for another day online.” Thankfully, I knew to book tickets in advance.

Along with Sagrada Familia, Spain’s other sights to book ahead include the Picasso Museum, La Pedrera, Casa Batllo and Park Guell in Barcelona; the Palacios Nazaries at the Alhambra in Granada; and the Royal Alcazar Moorish palace, Church of the Savior and cathedral in Sevilla. Barcelona’s Casa Amatller and Palace of Catalan Music and Salvador Dali’s house in Cadaques all require a guided tour, which also must be booked ahead. Advance tickets for the Dali Theater-Museum in nearby Figueres are also a good idea. While it may be technically possible to buy tickets on-site, in my guidebooks I simply say you must reserve in advance.

Here are more things to know if you have plans to travel to Spain and Portugal in 2019. Barcelona continues to evolve. After a long renovation, the Maritime Museum has reopened, displaying 13th- to 18th-century ships (restoration continues on the later-century ships). The El Raval neighborhood is rising up as the new bohemian zone. While this area has rough edges, its recently reopened Sant Antoni market hall, new Museum of Contemporary Art and pedestrian-friendly streets contribute to its boom of creative shops, bars and restaurants.

In Spain’s northern Basque country, San Sebastian’s old tobacco factory has been converted into the free Tabakalera International Center for Contemporary Culture, hosting films and art exhibits — and knockout views from its roof terrace. In Pamplona, a new exhibit gives a behind-the-scenes look at the town’s famous bullring.

In the south of Spain, the cathedral in Sevilla now runs rooftop tours, providing a better view than its bell tower climb. In nearby Cordoba, you can now climb the bell tower at the Mezquita, the massive mosque-turned-cathedral. But its 14th-century synagogue is closed.

Spain’s transportation is also improving: Uber is now available in Barcelona and Madrid. Madrid’s Metro has a new rechargeable card system: A red Multi Card (tarjeta) is required to buy either a single-ride Metro ticket or 10-ride transit ticket. Spain’s high-speed Alvia train now runs between Segovia and Salamanca in about 75 minutes, making it faster than driving.

Portugal has fewer blockbuster sights than Spain and nowhere near the crowds. The only sight where you might have a crowd problem is the Monastery of Jeronimos at Belem outside Lisbon (buy a combo-ticket at Belem’s Archaeology Museum to avoid the ticket line at the monastery).

Riding in Lisbon’s classic trolley cars — a quintessential Portuguese experience — can also be frustratingly crowded (and plagued by pickpockets targeting tourists). A less-crowded option is trolley line No. 24E. Although this route doesn’t pass many top sights, you can see a slice of workaday Lisbon.

On my last visit I realized that Lisbon’s beloved Alfama quarter — its Visigothic birthplace and once-salty sailors’ quarter — is salty no more (except with the sweat of cruise groups hiking its now-lifeless lanes). The new colorful zone to explore is the nearby Mouraria, the historic tangled quarter on the back side of the castle. This is where the Moors lived after the Reconquista (when Christian forces retook the city from the Muslims). To this day, it’s a gritty and colorful district of immigrants — but don’t delay — it’s starting to gentrify just like the Alfama.

In other Lisbon news, the Museum of Ancient Art finished its top-floor renovation, and plans to renovate its second floor in 2020. One of the city’s leading restaurants, Pap’Acorda, has moved to the first floor in the Ribeira market hall (aka Time Out Market). It’s recommended and serves Portuguese cuisine.

In the pilgrimage town of Fatima, where the Virgin Mary is said to have appeared in 1917, the new Fatima Light and Peace Exhibition run by the Roman Catholic Church complements a visit to the basilica.

In Coimbra, ticket options for the University of Coimbra sights, including the beautiful Baroque King Joao library, now cover the nearby and impressive Science Museum — go there first to buy your university tickets and book your required timed entry for the library.

In Porto, the Bolhao Market is closed for a much needed renovation until mid-2020. In the meantime, vendors are in the basement of a nearby department store.

Spain and Portugal have a continually evolving sightseeing scene, so it’s important to travel in 2019 with the latest information to get the most out of your experience.

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