Purdue Pharma, whose prescription opioid marketing practices are being blamed for sparking a nationwide overdose and addiction crisis, says it’s helping to fund an effort to make a lower-cost overdose antidote. (AP Photo/Douglas Healey, File)

Purdue Pharma, whose prescription opioid marketing practices are being blamed for sparking a nationwide overdose and addiction crisis, says it’s helping to fund an effort to make a lower-cost overdose antidote. (AP Photo/Douglas Healey, File)

Major opioid maker to pay for overdose-antidote development

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma announced that it’s making a $3.4M grant to Harm ReductionTherapeutics.

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