Special operations forces injured in explosion at Fort Bragg

An Army spokesman could not say the number of injured, extent of injuries or cause of the explosion.

Associated Press

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — An explosion during a training exercise injured a number of U.S. special operations forces at Fort Bragg on Thursday.

The soldiers were taken to the Army base’s Womack Army Medical Center for treatment, said Lt. Col. Rob Bockholt, a spokesman for the U.S. Army’s Special Operations Command, which is based at Fort Bragg.

Bockholt didn’t yet know the number of soldiers injured or the extent of those injuries. He also could not say what exactly caused them.

“There was an incident that occurred on one of the ranges,” Bockholt said, adding that the command is investigating. “We’re looking into exactly what happened.”

About 57,000 military personnel are attached to Fort Bragg, located next to Fayetteville, N.C. It is the largest Army installation by population and covers about 161,000 acres. The Special Operations Command has about 23,000 soldiers spread over several sites.

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