Janet Bacon leads the Giving Circle meeting of the 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County at the Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Janet Bacon leads the Giving Circle meeting of the 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County at the Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

100 women with $100 makes for a nice gift for a charity

100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County has doled out more than $162,000 since its inception in 2019.

EVERETT — One hundred women each armed with $100 is a force to be reckoned with.

In this case, it’s a force of exponential giving.

The group 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County gets together three times a year to pool their money for a charity.

Each member donates $100. They make a fun event of it and rake in some serious cash.

“People love what we’re doing. If I give 100 bucks, it’s great, but if 100 of us give 100 bucks, that’s huge,” said Janet Bacon, the local chapter’s co-founder. “That’s our goal, $10,000. Anything more than that is gravy.”

Usually, more than 100 people give $100 and some give more.

The group met at various venues in the past. At October’s meeting at the Everett Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge, they collected $20,275 for Babies of Homelessness.

Good gravy!

Members of 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County put their votes in a basket during their Giving Circle meeting at the Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Members of 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County put their votes in a basket during their Giving Circle meeting at the Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

This included $15,275 from the 100+ Women Who Care and $5,000 from Best Buy’s Richard Schulz Foundation. The money went to buy diapers, formula and wipes for babies that are homeless.

The local chapter, modeled after a national group, has raised more than $162,000 since it started in 2019.

The founding group was started in 2006 by a Michigan woman who had $100 to give to charity, and an epiphany: Her 100 bucks by itself wouldn’t do much, but what if she could muster $100 donations from 99 other women? Within an hour, her new group had raised $10,000 to give to a health center that provided cribs to needy families.

It goes like this: Three charities are in the running for the money at each meeting. They do short presentations about how the money would be used. And after the nominees leave the room, the women vote on which agency gets the money.

Previous recipients cover a spectrum of charities that includes services for seniors, child advocacy, and people with mental and physical disabilities.

Janet Bacon speaks to a large crowd during 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County’s Giving Circle meeting at the Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Janet Bacon speaks to a large crowd during 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County’s Giving Circle meeting at the Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Steven Landro, Normanna Lodge vice president, was so impressed by the group of women in his venue at the October meeting that he pitched in $100.

“It seemed a worthwhile cause and being there watching what they were doing, and how they do it, I just felt compelled to donate myself,” he said. “My bartender (Connie Herrington) who was working also donated $100.”

The downtown Everett lodge is designed for a mixed gender crowd, but he made it female-friendly. “I put a sign on the men’s restroom to make it a women’s restroom,” Landro said.

He’ll do it again. He offered the group free use of the lodge for future meetings.

Faith Food Bank in Everett was the first recipient of the women’s group in 2019.

Director Roxana Boroujerdi said when she entered her food bank for a chance to get $10,000, “It sounded like it would be like winning the lottery. I thought, ‘What the heck, I’ll try it.’”

She gave her pitch at the meeting.

“We so desperately needed the money,” she said.

A check for more than $142,000, the amount raised since the group started but not including the funds raised at the October meeting, is displayed during 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County’s Giving Circle meeting at the Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

A check for more than $142,000, the amount raised since the group started but not including the funds raised at the October meeting, is displayed during 100+ Women Who Care About Snohomish County’s Giving Circle meeting at the Sons of Norway Normanna Lodge in Everett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

She got more than money.

“I was hauling food in my little car and one of the women in the group donated her family’s van,” she said. “A small group within the 100 women, they formed their own little group and they bought us two commercial refrigerators and a commercial freezer, which was about another $10,000.”

The group meets again in February at the lodge.

Members are of all ages, with many in their early 30s to 80s.

People can come alone and meet new friends.

“We have a welcoming group,” Bacon said.

More at 100womensnohomish.com, 100womensnohomish@gmail.com or 214-883-4820.

Andrea Brown: 425-339-3443; abrown@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @reporterbrown.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Mountlake Terrace in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Mountlake Terrace council taps planning commissioner for open seat

With five votes, Rory Paine-Donovan was affirmed to join the ranks of the Mountlake Terrace City Council.

CEO Amy King standing outside of a Pallet shelter. (Courtesy of Pallet)
After rapid rise, Everett’s Pallet hits milestone: 100 shelter villages

Temporary home manufacturer Pallet hires locals who have “experienced homelessness, substance abuse or the justice system.”

Locals from the group Safe Lynnwood gather in front of the Ryann Building on 196th Street SW to protest the opening of a methadone clinic in the building on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023, in Lynnwood, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Despite controversy, Lynnwood opioid treatment center opens its doors

For weeks, protesters have objected to the center opening near Little League fields and a Boys and Girls Club.

A man was injured and a woman found dead Sunday night after an RV fire in Marysville. (Marysville Fire District)
Woman dead, man burned in Marysville RV fire

The Snohomish County Fire Marshal’s Office and Marysville Police Department were investigating the cause of the fire.

Ismael Cruz-Sanchez speaks at his sentencing at the Snohomish County Courthouse on Monday, Jan. 30, 2023 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Driver in fatal I-5 crash in Arlington gets 10 years

Ismael Cruz-Sanchez had a lengthy history with impaired driving. He pleaded guilty to killing Jason Vogan, 45.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Snohomish in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Boil water advisory in effect for 75 Snohomish homes

A water main break resulted in outages and possible contamination Sunday. Service was expected to return by Wednesday.

NO CAPTION NECESSARY: Logo for the Cornfield Report by Jerry Cornfield. 20200112
No right turns on red gets a look, a bid to expand sports betting arrives

It’s a new week. Here’s what’s happening on Day 22 of the 2023 session of the Washington Legislature

The final 747 is revealed during a celebration in Everett, Washington on Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2023. The plane was rolled out Dec. 6 from the Everett assembly factory and delivered to the customer, Atlas Air. (Annie Barker / The Herald)
‘Still jaw-dropping’: Last Boeing 747 takes the stage in Everett

Thousands, including actor John Travolta, gathered at Boeing’s Everett factory to bid goodbye to the “Queen of the Skies.”

Logo for news use, for stories regarding Washington state government — Olympia, the Legislature and state agencies. No caption necessary. 20220331
Lobbyist barred from WA Capitol after ruling he stalked representative

State Rep. Lauren Davis, D-Shoreline, obtained a domestic violence protective order against longtime lobbyist Cody Arledge.

Most Read