Jordan Hoffman-Nelson (left) and Camille Ovena of Bella’s Voice accept an award for Small Non-Profit Employer of the Year for hiring and working with people with disabilities. (Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues & Employment)

Jordan Hoffman-Nelson (left) and Camille Ovena of Bella’s Voice accept an award for Small Non-Profit Employer of the Year for hiring and working with people with disabilities. (Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues & Employment)

Employers recognized for helping people with disabilities

Way to Go

Swedish Edmonds and Bella’s Voice of Lynnwood were honored on Nov. 1 by Washington’s Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues & Employment and Disability: In Washington at the 27th Annual Governor’s Employer Awards ceremony, held at the Microsoft Conference Center in Redmond.

Swedish Edmonds hospital was selected as a 2019 Youth Employer of the Year. Bella’s Voice — a small thrift store whose proceeds are dedicated to no-kill shelters and animal organizations in Snohomish County — was selected as the 2019 Small Non-Profit Employer of the Year. Both were lauded for hiring and working with people with disabilities.

“This year, Washingtonians nominated 25 employers and eight individuals for these esteemed awards,” said Conrad Reynoldson, chairman of the awards Subcommittee. “The success of our ceremony highlights that inclusion is not just the right thing to do; it also makes good business sense.”

Community Transit honored for employing veterans

The state Employment Security Department recognized 12 Washington businesses and agencies for their efforts to employ military veterans in 2019.

One of those was Snohomish County’s Community Transit.

Community Transit recruited and hired 11 veterans in 2019. The company employs more than 800 people, of which 102 are veterans. The transit agency also participates in WorkSource job fair preparation workshops to educate veterans about effective resumes and applications, and about properly using LinkedIn and other social media. The company proudly displays a Wall of Honor at its headquarters, recognizing veterans who have served.

“Veterans are among the best-trained candidates in the job market and make outstanding employees,” said Suzi LeVine, commissioner of the Employment Security Department. “These leading companies hire veterans because it’s good for business. I encourage other Washington employers to strongly consider veterans in their next hiring decisions.”

Women’s shelter getting tech upgrade

Monroe Gospel Women’s Mission director Adriana Moreno and administrative assistant Linda Stima hold up a $1,500 check from Providence General Foundation in Everett. (Monroe Gospel Women’s Mission)

Monroe Gospel Women’s Mission director Adriana Moreno and administrative assistant Linda Stima hold up a $1,500 check from Providence General Foundation in Everett. (Monroe Gospel Women’s Mission)

The Providence Foundation in Everett donated $1,500 to Monroe Gospel Women’s Mission for two new laptops and a new printer.

Through access to these technologies, their clients are now able to complete online applications, stay on top of email correspondences, find jobs available in their area, and more important activities.

“Something as simple as a laptop, which most of us use every day, can be the difference between homelessness and hope,” a statement from the Women’s Mission says.

Jackson High student picked for national civic engagement program

Henry M. Jackson High School junior Akila Rajan was selected to take part in the Youth Collaboratory, a year-long national civic engagement program. (Photo by Brandon Patoc / Everett Public Schools)

Henry M. Jackson High School junior Akila Rajan was selected to take part in the Youth Collaboratory, a year-long national civic engagement program. (Photo by Brandon Patoc / Everett Public Schools)

Henry M. Jackson High junior Akila Rajan is one of 24 students selected from across the U.S. to participate in a year-long civic engagement program called the Youth Collaboratory.

Rajan will travel to Atlanta, Georgia in February and New York in May with the Youth Collaboratory to meet with national civic innovators. In the coming months, she will be completing a “power project” in the community to increase awareness of how power functions in society and how people can access power.

Every year a cohort of 24 highly-motivated students passionate about making a positive change in their communities and country travel to cities around the nation, meeting leading civic innovators, participating in workshops on citizen power and completing independent projects in their communities that address a need they see where they live.

Citizen University launched the Youth Collaboratory in 2017 as part of the Youth Power Project, a multi-year effort supported by the Ford Foundation to empower and connect a rising generation of civic leaders and doers.

Golfing for a cause

On Oct. 14, Cedar Grove Composting made great use of the last rays of fall sun, by sponsoring their third annual Cedar Grove Golf Invitational to benefit Banchero Disability Partners.

The event was held at The Everett Golf and Country Club and raised over $83,000 that will go to Banchero Disability Partners programs and services. Cedar Grove underwrote all expenses, so every dollar raised has been passed along to the nonprofit.

“Proceeds from this event help us to provide desperately needed services to adults who have developmental disabilities. Cedar Grove and individual donors came together for a fun day, and we are truly grateful for their support that will boost us for the whole year” said CaraLee Cook, Executive Director of Banchero Disability Partners.

More in Local News

Coming Sunday: Unauthorized marinas on the Snohomish River

This week on “Herald Headlines,” reporter Joey Thompson previews a story about boats parked illegally.

Inslee draws a line in the battle on clean fuels law

Rebuffed in 2019, the Democratic governor is turning up the heat on those in his party who oppose it.

Dog found dead after mini storage fire in Snohomish

Snohomish County Fire District 4 said firefighters didn’t find anyone in three damaged units.

Customer accidentally shoots woman at Oak Harbor restaurant

Both were eating at Fraser’s Gourmet Hideaway. The woman didn’t initially realize she’d been wounded.

Olympic weightlifter convicted of sex abuse of Everett girl

Manuel Minginfel was a star Olympian, competing four times for Micronesia. Now he’s headed to prison.

Census hiring hundreds countywide for help with 2020 count

Workers are temporarily needed starting in May. Pay is $20 per hour, and schedules are flexible.

County hires UW-Bothell vice chancellor to lead Public Works

Kelly Snyder will replace Steve Thomsen, who retired in December after 33 years with the county.

Nurses at Swedish say they’ll deliver 10-day strike notice

SEIU Healthcare 1199NW announced Thursday members will file a strike notice at each hospital campus.

In her Mill Creek area home, Joni Earl, former Sound Transit CEO, and author Bob Wodnik talk about the transit agency’s decades-long effort to bring light rail to the region. Wodnik, a former Herald writer, has written “Back on Track,” a new book about the battles for light rail. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Light rail’s tenacious supporter: Joni Earl at center of book

In his new history of Sound Transit, former Herald writer Bob Wodnik delves into complex battles.

Most Read