A bus picks up passengers at the corner of Broadway and California Street in Everett on Thursday. (Ian Terry / The Herald)

A bus picks up passengers at the corner of Broadway and California Street in Everett on Thursday. (Ian Terry / The Herald)

Everett bus stop upgrades: Sidewalk extensions, public art

Money designated for the arts will complement another $3 million in construction work.

EVERETT — Nearly all the bus stops on Broadway are getting upgrades that include elements of public art.

The state awarded Everett Transit a $3 million grant to redo the bus stops between 34th and Tower streets. The stops will be modified into “bus bulbs.” That means a concrete pad extends from the sidewalk, so buses can pick up and drop off passengers in the far-right lane.

It’s more efficient than pulling over, and it takes up less space, said Sabina Popa, a program manager with Everett Transit.

In addition to the grant, the project draws from money allocated for the arts under city codes. Some of those funds are tied to the Everett Station project from 2002.

A couple of years ago, residents Sharita Burton and Richard Smith had approached the city about beautifying Broadway through art, including concepts for bus shelters, according to the mayor’s office.

Broadway is seeing a revitalization, particularly to the north. New housing projects are going up, and the college district is growing around Everett Community College and WSU Everett.

Construction on the bus stops is scheduled to begin this summer and wrap up by June 2019. It will include intermittent lane closures.

A series of new bus stops is planned on Broadway using “bus bulbs,” which move the stop off the main sidewalk and get rid of bus turnout areas. (Everett Transit)

A series of new bus stops is planned on Broadway using “bus bulbs,” which move the stop off the main sidewalk and get rid of bus turnout areas. (Everett Transit)

The art piece still is getting figured out, said Carol Thomas, Everett’s cultural arts manager. The city is talking with Brian Borrello, a Portland artist with experience in civic projects and transportation themes.

A group of local folks was tasked with reviewing applications from artists. They liked that Borrello’s work draws on community context, Thomas said.

“He wanted to get to know everybody on Broadway,” she said.

The designs will emerge from a series of public meetings, she said. That means it could be a mural or mosaic, something within the shelter itself, something on the roof … They don’t want to make decisions until they gather input.

After construction, Broadway will have 24 bus stops in that stretch, Popa said. All those stops will have bike racks, seating areas and trash cans. All but two will have rain shelters.

A bus stop outside the Broadway Taco Bell is among more than two dozen that will be remodeled in the months ahead. (Rikki King / The Herald)

A bus stop outside the Broadway Taco Bell is among more than two dozen that will be remodeled in the months ahead. (Rikki King / The Herald)

The project also calls for LED lights in the shelters. Light could be incorporated into the art as well, and possibly a red roof in line with Everett Transit’s branding, Popa said. The idea is create something that’s durable, low maintenance and easy to replicate in future projects, as funding is available.

There are some rules around art and roadways, and city engineers have to sign off on the final plans, Thomas said.

Still, “to stand out on Broadway and make an impact, it probably can’t be shy,” she said.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @rikkiking.

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