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OPPORTUNITY

Give blood for kids

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, and the American Red Cross is encouraging eligible donors to give blood to support kids, teens and young adults battling cancer.

The National Cancer Institute estimated that more than 15,000 children and adolescents in the U.S. would be diagnosed with cancer last year. Childhood cancer patients may need blood products on a regular basis during chemotherapy, surgery or treatment for complications.

Platelet donors and blood donors of all blood types are urgently needed to replenish the blood supply following a summer blood shortage. As a thank you, those who come to give this Friday through Tuesday will receive a unique Red Cross canvas tote bag, while supplies last.

Make an appointment to donate by downloading the free Red Cross Blood Donor app, going to RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

More info: RedCrossBlood.org/HostADrive

EVENTS

MukFest

The Mukilteo Lighthouse Festival is Sept. 6-8 at the Mukilteo Lighthouse Park. Music, games, food, beer and more at the town’s biggest annual party.

Admission is free. Using a shuttle service is advised.

Fireworks begin at dusk Sept. 7.

More info: mukfest.com

Special screening

Join local history enthusiasts for a screening of “Such a Special Place: Clark Park,” produced by the Bayside Neighborhood Association at 6 p.m. Sept. 10 at the Everett Library, 2702 Hoyt Ave.

Capturing the voices of early Everett through oral history, this documentary describes the important role that Clark Park played in building a sense of community among residents. This event is part of the Hands on History series led by Northwest Room staff. Hands on History meets on the second Tuesday of every month in the library auditorium.

More info: 425-257-8000 or check events at www.epls.org

Parenting teens

Parents of teenagers are invited to a six-part series designed to help with raising young people, starting at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 10 at the Marysville Library, 6120 Grove St. Classes run through Nov. 19.

The course is sponsored by the Marysville Together Coalition, Friends of the Marysville Library and the Snohomish Health District. It was developed with information from the 2018 Healthy Youth Survey that took place in Marysville.

Presentation topics have to do with ways to deal with depression and anxiety, how to help students feel safe at school, parenting and communication styles, and issues specifically affecting Marysville youth.

Register online for these free events. A light meal is provided.

More info: Visit sno-isle.org/parentingteens or call 360-658-5000

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