Front Porch

EVENTS

Meet a live bat

The Bat Lady, also known as Barbara Ogaard, will give a presentation on our winged friends at 7 p.m. Friday at the Northwest Stream Center, located at McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. Ogaard rehabilitates injured bats for the Sarvey Wildlife Center and is a researcher for Bats Northwest.

Reservations are required. Cost is $7, $5 for Adopt A Stream Foundation members.

More info: 425-316-8592

Edmonds book sale features local authors

Read local at a special display of Northwest authors at this month’s Friends of the Edmonds Library’s ongoing book sale at the Edmonds Library, 650 Main St. Proceeds benefit library programs.

More info: edmondslibraryfriends.org

SUPPORT

Ostomy support group

The United Ostomy Associations of America, Snohomish County Chapter, meets from 1 to 3 p.m. second Mondays (except July and an annual picnic in August) at the Buzz Inn restaurant, 3121 Broadway, Everett. The group’s purpose is to help in the rehabilitation of people with ostomies.

More info: Cathryn at 425-610-3770, www.snohomishcountyostomy.org

Head injury support groups available

Support groups for brain-incident survivors and their caregivers meet regularly across Snohomish County.

An Edmonds group meets from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. first Tuesdays on the second floor of Swedish Edmonds Medical Center, 21601 76th Ave. W. Contact: Lou Nash, 425-776-7264 or lou_nash@frontier.com.

An Everett group meets from 6:30 to 8 p.m. third Thursdays in the Padovan Room at Providence Medical Center Pacific Campus, 916 Pacific Ave. Contact: Janet Mott, 206-972-9305 or janetm@biawa.org.

A Stanwood-Camano group meets from 6:30 to 8 p.m. third Mondays in the library at the Stanwood Community and Senior Center, 7430 276th St. NW. Contact: Karen Furney, 425-268-2934.

More info: biawa.org, 877-824-1766

HEADS UP

New request form for Mill Creek residents

Mill Creek has a new way for residents to make requests or report problems.

An online Response Center allows users to report issues, such as graffiti, overgrown vegetation and stormwater drainage concerns, to name just a few. Some submitted requests are displayed as pins on a map, along with a color to indicate if the task has been completed or not. You can click on a pin to see the specifics of a request.

Last week, all the colored pins related to roadway concerns. The most common types of submissions are public records requests, general comments and reports of code violations. The new request system is part of a larger $22,100 website overhaul. A $10,000 grant from the Snohomish County Lodging Tax Advisory Committee helped pay for the work, which included a tourism element.

More info: cityofmillcreek.com/responsecenter

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