Historic Everett building to be named for 3-term mayor

EVERETT — Everett’s longest-serving mayor is finally getting a building named after him.

Bill Moore was mayor for three terms from 1977-1990, and had sat on the City Council since 1969.

So it’s only appropriate that the building where he once worked will now officially bear his name: William E. Moore Historic City Hall.

Moore died in 1997 at age 76.

The decision to name the building after Moore had been debated for years, and in fact has been a done deal since the council approved the naming of the building after him in December.

On Saturday, Sept. 13, a dedication ceremony led by Mayor Ray Stephanson will make the name official.

“I think it’s an incredible recognition of Bill Moore and his service to the city of Everett,” Stephanson said.

Moore was a dedicated leader who prioritized building up the city’s infrastructure and was an early champion of Naval Station Everett.

“I think clearly that base would not have been here without Bill’s involvement and support vote,” Stephanson said.

The renamed building will join the list of public facilities in Everett named after former city leaders, including the Carl Gipson Senior Center, Edward D. Hansen Conference Center, Drew Nielsen Neighborhood Park, and (Bill) Langus Riverfront Park, the latter of which was expanded under Moore’s leadership.

The art deco-style Historic City Hall building at 3002 Wetmore Ave. was designed by Seattle architect A.H. Albertson and built in 1929. The building was renovated in 1978-79 during Moore’s administration, and it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.

In the 1990s the city purchased the Wall Street building and moved all its administrative officers across the street. The Historic City Hall building now houses the Everett Police Department and the City Council Chambers.

But the passage to naming the building after its longtime resident wasn’t always smooth.

The nonprofit group Historic Everett came out against naming the building after Moore because a city policy prohibited renaming landmarks on historical registries.

The city later revised that code to reflect what was probably its actual intent, to protect historic buildings that already bore someone’s name, such as the Van Valey House, from being renamed for someone else.

On Sept. 13, the new plaque will be unveiled at the old City Hall building, ensuring Bill Moore’s name will be attached to his former office for years to come.

“My father would be very humbled and extremely honored to be recognized for his years of public service in the city which he dearly loved,” said Jeff Moore, Bill Moore’s youngest son who now sits on the council as council president.

Stephanson added that Moore was a warm and generous human being who was also fun to work with.

“He always had this look on his face and a sort of a chuckle, that he knew something nobody else knew. He was a delight,” Stephanson said.

Chris Winters: 425-374-4165 or cwinters@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @Chris_At_Herald.

Dedication ceremony

Mayor Ray Stephanson, City Council members and other city leaders will formally dedicate the Historic City Hall building to former mayor William E. Moore at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 13. The Everett Police Department will present the color guard ceremony and the department’s choir will perform. The building is located at 3002 Wetmore Ave.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Deena Jones gets a physical by Briana Brewer during one of her twice weekly checkups Thursday morning at UW Medicine in Seattle on September 30, 2021. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Her brother offered a kidney, and she got one, with a twist

Deena Jones’ nephew died in a random knife attack. His death could keep the Arlington pastor alive for decades.

Community Transit is preparing to shift commuter buses that go to the University of Washington in Seattle to connect with Link light rail in Northgate next year. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Union: Community Transit vaccine mandate puts jobs in ‘jeopardy’

Meanwhile, at King County Metro, a similar mandate has significantly boosted vaccination rates.

Man injured in Marysville gas station shooting

People in two vehicles reportedly opened fire Monday morning. Detectives were seeking suspect information.

Mukilteo asks for input on housing density, and it’s complicated

Here’s a guide to what voters should know about the advisory ballot measure. What does it actually do?

The concrete wall of the tennis courts at Clark Park in Everett was painted into a bright mural by people over two weekends. (Jay Austria)
Neighbors brighten Clark Park wall in Everett

People grabbed brushes and painted the concrete tennis court wall over two… Continue reading

An emergency responder uses a line to navigate the steep slope along a Forest Service road where seven people were injured Saturday when a vehicle went off the road near the Boulder River trailhead west of Darrington. (Darrington Fire District)
7 hurt in crash off cliff west of Darrington; 1 airlfited

A vehicle crashed on a forest service road near Boulder River, leading to a major rescue operation.

The aftermath of a fire that damaged a unit at the Villas at Lakewood apartment complex in Marysville on Saturday. (Marysville Fire District)
2 families displaced by Marysville apartment fire

Nobody was injured when the fire broke out Saturday morning on 27th Avenue NE.

Kevin Gallagher (from the Snohomish County Official Local Voters’ Pamphlet November 2, 2021 General Election)
Kevin Gallagher, a Marysville City Council candidate, dies

Kevin Gallagher, 52, died at home of natural causes. He was challenging incumbent Councilmember Tom King.

Clouds hover over the waters off Everett's western edge Monday morning. (Sue Misao / The Herald)
Get ready for La Niña and a soggy winter in Snohomish County

After a hot, dry summer, Washington feels like Washington again. Damp. Gray. Normal.

Most Read