Taryn Hauglie wears a Ruth Bader Ginsburg-inspired mask while she turns in her ballot at the Snohomish County Campus ballot box on Tuesday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Taryn Hauglie wears a Ruth Bader Ginsburg-inspired mask while she turns in her ballot at the Snohomish County Campus ballot box on Tuesday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Last-minute votes roll in on a tense election day

Many in Snohomish County had more than just the presidential race in mind on Tuesday.

EVERETT — It was a quiet and rainy around Snohomish County Tuesday before a stormy election night.

Roughly 71.2% of registered voters had already turned in ballots by Monday evening, almost exactly in line with state turnout figures released at the same time — 72.7 %.

Unlike Seattle and cities nationwide, downtown businesses in Everett were not boarded up in case of possible unrest. In Snohomish, there were a few pickup trucks waving “Trump” and “Culp” signs around town, just like any other day.

In Mountlake Terrace, incumbent Democratic U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen and supporters held signs in a final appeal for votes.

Even though 368,000 people had already submitted ballots in the county, a stream of last-minute voters headed to local drop boxes with envelopes Tuesday in the historic presidential election between former vice president Joseph Biden and President Donald Trump.

Carole Defillo, 54, came from Monroe to turn in her ballot at the Snohomish County Campus in Everett.

“I am concerned about making sure my ballot gets counted,” she said.

Rather than putting her signed envelope in the drop box on Wall Street, where there was no one waiting, she walked through the rain to the voting office in hopes of getting an “I voted” sticker.

About 10 others waited in line outside the building mid-morning. Defillo said she was prepared to wait an hour, but after learning they weren’t handing out stickers, she put her ballot in the drop box.

It was still worth the trip.

People sit outside of the County Public Meeting Room to fill out and turn in their ballots on Tuesday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

People sit outside of the County Public Meeting Room to fill out and turn in their ballots on Tuesday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

“I work from home and it gives me a reason to get out of the house,” she said.

C.J. Ford, 27, of Snohomish, slid his ballot into an Everett drop box on his way to work at his courier company.

“It was normal, just like dropping off mail,” Ford said. “Political tensions are high, but I feel like they’ve always been high. There might be years where it might crest or peak or valley. Everyone’s angry during politics season.”

Not him.

“I got really into it in 2016,” Ford said. “That was the first time I was really like, ‘Oh, politics. I’m an adult. I should pay attention to this.’”

He doesn’t plan to stay up late to watch the results.

“I’ll find it out tomorrow,” he said.

Business was slow Tuesday at the Stag Barber Shop, where Snohomish barber Bob Martin opened in defiance of Gov. Jay Inslee’s stay-home coronavirus order.

Congressman Rick Larsen waves and holds signs with supporters Tuesday in Mountlake Terrace. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

“This election will show which way it’s going to go,” Martin said. “If there’s any social unrest, we have a way of taking care of our own problems in Snohomish.”

As for Martin, 80, he planned to go home after the shop closed.

“What will be will be,” he said.

An afternoon trip to the gym was a priority for Bernard Moody, the Republican candidate for the 38th Legislative District against Democrat June Robinson, a veteran in state politics.

“I’m going to get my workout in to get rid of this corona fat I’ve accumulated in all these months,” said Moody, 60.

People line up outside of the County Public Meeting Room to turn in ballots, register to vote and get help on Tuesday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

People line up outside of the County Public Meeting Room to turn in ballots, register to vote and get help on Tuesday in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Then he planned to start collecting his signs around town. Well, all that would fit in his car, that is. The first-time candidate bought 400 for his campaign and wanted to leave a good impression, win or lose.

“I don’t like that eye pollution any more than anybody else does,” he said.

He was in no hurry to know the outcome of the election.

“Quite honestly, I don’t want to watch the results, so I’m trying to find something that I can do,” Moody said. “I want to have a prayer meeting with a couple of friends, and pray for our nation and a peaceful transition regardless of the results.”

Andrea Brown: abrown@heraldnet.com; 425339 -3443. Twitter @reporterbrown.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Amethyst Skeels and Alexander Walsh pick out cannabis products at Kushman's Everett Cannabis Dispensary on Evergreen Way on Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2020 in Everett, Washington.  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Cannabis sales surge, proving pot is pandemic-proof

There are more customers, and some regulars are stocking up — just in case there’s a shortage.

Leslie Bringedahl grabs a bag containing books she and her husband Mark ordered after Circulation Manager Carol  puts them down on a wall during curbside pickup at the Everett Public Library on Wednesday, June 17, 2020 in Everett, Wa.(Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Everett council looks to fund fireworks, Jetty Island ferry

The Carl Gipson Senior Center and boosting library funding are also “quality of life” priorities.

Santa Claus is coming to town, despite the coronavirus

He’ll follow social distancing. In one setting, children are invited to “call out” their wishes.

Driver arrested after allegedly hitting woman in crosswalk

The suspect was driving an SUV on Highway 99 in Lynnwood and is under investigation for DUI.

COVID cases, hospitalizations and deaths continue to rise

A new exposure notification app is here, and vaccines are on the way, but the virus continues to surge.

This series of screenshots taken from an iPhone with COVID-19 exposure notifications turned on for Washington state shows some of the information presented to iPhone users who are considering opting in to a new statewide coronavirus exposure notification program that was launched Monday, Nov. 30, 2020, in Washington state that uses smartphone technology in the ongoing effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19. People with Apple iPhones can now enable the 'exposure notifications' feature that is already in their phone's settings, and Android devices can download the app, called Washington Exposure Notifications. Use of the service is voluntary and users can opt out at any time. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Washington launches statewide COVID-19 notification app

Modeling predicted significant decreases in infections and deaths if at least 15% of people use the app.

Public Health Essentials! (Snohomish Health District)
Five things to know about COVID vaccine planning

Public Health Essentials! A blog by the Snohomish Health District.

Controlled explosion rattles Cathcart and much of the county

Deputies were investigating a 19-year-old who had an “enormous amount of fireworks” near Silver Lake.

Police: Suspect in fatal hit-and-run may have used marijuana

The Lynnwood man allegedly didn’t stop to check on a pedestrian whom he hit with a pickup truck.

Most Read