Everett Public Library                                Members of the 63rd Coast Artillery Corps parade past Joe King’s tavern in the 1300 block of Hewitt Avenue on March 12, 1918, after returning from France following the end of World War I. A crowd estimated at 15,000 lined the curbs to meet the soldiers on a warm, breezy and sunny day.

Everett Public Library Members of the 63rd Coast Artillery Corps parade past Joe King’s tavern in the 1300 block of Hewitt Avenue on March 12, 1918, after returning from France following the end of World War I. A crowd estimated at 15,000 lined the curbs to meet the soldiers on a warm, breezy and sunny day.

Looking back: Johnny comes marching home

An Everett crowd of 15,000 celebrated the return of WWI soldiers.

Delayed by heavy snows in the Cascades, the first troop train bringing home the doughboys of the 63rd Coast Artillery Corps did not arrive at the Great Northern station in Everett until nearly noon.

“Far away down the track the cheers of the crowd and the music of the band reached our ears, and as we pulled into the station the throng swarmed the platform to be the first to exchange greetings,” Private John Brown wrote in his diary on March 12, 1919. “The parade was soon formed and we moved down the street in our first parade in Washington.”

A crowd estimated at 15,000 had started forming at 7 a.m. It lined the curbs on a warm, breezy and sunny day to greet 454 men and 16 officers.

Formed in December 1917 at Fort Worden around Port Townsend, the Puget Sound unit departed for France on June 13, 1918 as part of the Allied Expeditionary Force. They arrived a month later and were stationed and trained at Limoges, France. They never saw combat before leaders signed the armistice ending the war in November, 1918. Their only casualty was the result of drowning.

Now, demobilization was less than two weeks away.

The men looked “hard and fit,” as they marched up a Hewitt Avenue lined with bunting and American flags to the music of three bands,” The Everett Daily Herald reported on its front page. People sitting in cars blocked every cross street.

“Tears, smiles, chaffing, but little noise marked the welcome,” according to the newspaper. “It was not a crowd that felt like demonstrating with clamor.”

Afterward, the women of Everett feted soldiers with pies, cakes and coffee at Pastime pool room while the officers were served a chicken dinner at the Elks’ club.

“If any man had less than he could eat, it was his fault,” the newspaper story read.

Later that afternoon, the men boarded the train again bound for Seattle. Another parade awaited.

Talk to us

More in Local News

The parking lot of a Lynnwood apartment complex in the 19800 block of 50th Avenue West where a man was allegedly stabbed Friday night. (Lynnwood Police)
Lynnwood man arrested for allegedly stabbing acquaintance

They were arguing at an apartment complex and began fighting.

A storm Sunday caused damage to power lines like this on Woods Creek Road in Monroe across Snohomish County. Another storm was projected for later Monday. (Snohomish County PUD)
PUD restores power and braces for new windy problems

About 55,000 Snohomish County PUD customers lost power Sunday. Most of them had their power restored by the next day.

Top row (L-R): Brian Saulsman, Jeremiah Campbell and Mary Reule. Bottom row (L-R): Molly Barnes, Janine Burkhardt and Sarah Johnson. Not pictured (and running unopposed): Jennifer Bumpus.
Mandates, critical race theory steal spotlight in Monroe school races

In Snohomish County, school board races have become a proxy for ideological battles. Monroe is a prime example.

Woman, 60, shot after neighbor dispute near Everett

The suspect, 19, confronted the woman with a shotgun, and allegedly shot her.

Top row (L-R): Kim Daughtry, Michele Hampton, Gary Petershagen, Joyce Copley. Bottom row (L-R): Jessica Wadhams, Steve Ewing, Marcus A. Tageant, Joseph Jensen.
In growing Lake Stevens, controversy frames council races

The city is booming with development. Now four incumbents look to fend off challengers.

Top (L-R): Judy Schwab, Peter Swardstrom. Bottom (L-R): Jayme Lee Vail, Charles Hauck.
Masks? Sex ed? Where do Mukilteo school board candidates stand?

Three newcomers are in races for two seats. In each case, there’s a candidate calling for a “back to basics” approach.

Top (L-R): Alicia Crank, Kristiana Johnson, Janelle Cass. Bottom (L-R): Will Chen, Neil Tibbott, Adrienne Fraley-Monillas.
Q&A: Edmonds candidates talk policy on hot-button issues

Six candidates are running for three City Council seats. The Daily Herald quizzed them on housing, tree code and more.

Caregiver charged with raping Everett woman with dementia

A DNA sample found “very strong support” that Kelvin Njeru was the suspect, prosecutors allege.

Top (L-R): Nate Nehring, Nicole Ng-A-Qui, Jared M. Mead. Bottom (L-R): Brenda Carrington, Sam Low, Brandy Donaghy.
3 challengers face long-shot odds in County Council races

Each race has a clear political divide. And each Snohomish County district reliably leans either red or blue.

Most Read