Many questions about mom accused in infant deaths

SALT LAKE CITY — Investigators are reconstructing a mysterious decade from Megan Huntsman’s life as they try to figure out how she concealed seven pregnancies before allegedly strangling or suffocating her newborns.

Utah investigators are examining DNA from the babies to determine who the parents are, studying the bones to find out how long ago the babies died and interrogating family members and talking to neighbors in pursuit of clues about how she did it.

Huntsman, 39, acknowledged to police that she killed the babies, put them in plastic bags and then packed them inside boxes in the garage of her home south of Salt Lake City over a decade from 1996 to 2006.

Investigators are trying to determine why she did it and who else, if anybody, knew about it or was involved. During the timeline she’s given, she lived in the house with her now estranged husband and their three daughters.

Huntsman, who was arrested Sunday on six counts of murder, was ordered held on $6 million bail — $1 million for each baby. She is due in court Monday for an arraignment.

Investigators are done with initial interviews of family, friends and neighbors and are digging into evidence, Pleasant Grove Police Capt. Mike Roberts said. They haven’t ruled doing more interviews or making more arrests.

“It is a slow, meticulous process,” Roberts said.

Huntsman’s estranged husband, Darren West, made the discovery Saturday with fellow family members while cleaning out the garage of the house, which is owned by his parents. Police said they are trying to determine his knowledge or involvement.

Many of the answers hinge on what the Utah state medical examiner finds out in its examinations of the seven tiny bodies, which were found in various stages of decomposition in boxes that were on shelves and cabinets in the garage.

Greg Hess, Pima County chief medical examiner in southern Arizona, said forensic anthropologists should eventually be able to determine the sex of the babies based on the DNA results. They should also be able to determine if babies were full term by examining the bones.

But they probably won’t be able to figure out if they babies were born alive unless one measures significantly bigger than a typical newborn or there are obvious signs of trauma that caused the death, Hess said. His office handles hundreds of bodies a year found in varying degrees of decomposition in the harsh Arizona desert.

The inability to scientifically determine if the babies were born alive could be key later if defense attorneys argue that the babies were stillborn. Huntsman told police that only one of the seven was stillborn, charging documents show.

Determining exactly how long ago the babies died will be challenging, Hess said. Unlike what is sometimes portrayed in movies and TV shows like CSI, forensic anthropologists cannot pinpoint the date and time precisely. Sometimes, the estimated time of death can span a 10- to 15-year window, Hess said.

“The older the remains, the larger the window is,” Hess said. “The more recent the remains, the tighter you can make the window.”

The question of whether Huntsman was using drugs during the pregnancies remains unanswered. Roberts declined to discuss what investigators have found out in this regard.

Her husband, West, spent more than eight years in federal prison after pleading guilty to possessing chemicals intended to be used in manufacturing methamphetamine. West was released from a federal prison in California in January and transferred to a halfway house in Salt Lake City.

It will likely be very difficult for the medical examiner to shed any light on whether the babies had something wrong with them, Hess said, unless there is was an odd skeletal abnormality. Studies to assess conditions such as Down syndrome are done on live tissue, he said.

Neighbors have described Huntsman as a nice, quiet woman who was trusted to take care of children and generally seen as a good person.

Police have been talking with many of them in search of clues. Next-door neighbor SanDee Wall said police asked her about whether Huntsman looked pregnant, if she was seen with other men and about a small trailer in the backyard. Wall told them she noticed weight fluctuations over the years, but didn’t notice any men coming and going or anything odd happening in the trailer.

More in Local News

Nation’s first coronavirus patient said to be fully recovered

The Snohomish Health District has released the man from home isolation.

Gun-ammunition bill is suffocated by GOP amendments

It’s Day 40 of 60 of the 2020 session of the Washington Legislature in Olympia.

Chris Walsh and his wife, Carol, talk outside the Delta Rehabilitation Center about their plans to close the care facility long known as the Snohomish Chalet. Chris is the owner and administrator of the nursing home that cares for people with severe brain injuries. Carol has worked as a nurse there for many years. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Delta Rehabilitation, home to brain injury victims, to close

“There’s no replacement,” head of care facility agency says of place once known as Snohomish Chalet.

A Hamas heir, a nose job, $1.5 million — and global intrigue

An urgent plastic surgery request in Lynnwood may have exposed huge fraud by a Palestinian refugee.

Edmonds School District leaders plan for another school bond

It won’t be in April, but the district could float another bond proposal in August or November.

Boeing asks that its big state tax break be suspended

The company hopes the move will resolve a trade dispute involving European rival Airbus.

Everett defense investigator stripped of license

Witness tampering charges against Michael Powers were dropped, in a deal that ends his career.

Body scanner could replace strip searches in Monroe prison

A new bill suggests using a scanner, like those in airports, to check for contraband on or in people.

High school wrestler steps in after twin faces fight of his life

SULTAN — Tyler Deason was the one his family thought would be competing at the state high school wrestling tournament.

Most Read