Marysville Globe 
                                The Marysville Opera House was packed with about 300 people at the recent Marysville Brew and Cider Fest.

Marysville Globe The Marysville Opera House was packed with about 300 people at the recent Marysville Brew and Cider Fest.

Marysville is singing the praises of its Opera House

One staffer said said the facility is booking events two years in advance these days.

By Steven Powell

The Marysville Globe

MARYSVILLE — When the city of Marysville bought the Opera House in 2016, it was called a “hidden jewel” and the city’s “best-kept secret.”

“It’s not the best-kept secret anymore,” city parks director Jim Ballew told the City Council on Monday night.

City staff said the number of rentals has gone up from 34 to 36, city events from 50 to 58 and performances from 36 to 58.

When sponsors, classes, concessions and ticket sales are added in, the gross revenue went from $26,000 the first year, to $44,350 the second year, and to $77,834 this past year.

Staffer Lauren Woodmansee said there have been 129 events so far this year. She said the public is giving the facility “phenomenal” feedback, with 4- and 5-star reviews.

“People are coming to us wanting to be part of what we’re doing,” she said of sponsors.

Ballew said sponsorships are helping keep ticket prices down.

He also said the city has developed some great partnerships with local service clubs that provide things like beer and wine.

“We don’t get a piece of that,” but it adds value to the event, he said.

Ballew said they are still learning how to “flip” the facility from one type of event to another, but that he thinks they could possibly do 25 percent more.

“We’re not turning anyone away,” he said.

He also said they are still working on pricing. He said it’s “alarming” how much others are charging for events this summer. “We’ll see how they do,” he said, adding the city doesn’t want to price themselves out of any business.

As the statistics show, the Opera House is doing well. Staffer Tara Mizell said people are booking the facility two years down the line.

Ballew said their business model is to cover their debt. “We’re beyond that,” he said.

This story originally appeared in the Marysville Globe, a sibling paper of The Daily Herald.

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