Molester who volunteered confession gets 6 years

EVERETT — Some 15 years after abusing a toddler in his care, a Shoreline man is headed to prison a convicted sex offender.

Christian Flores, 37, told a judge Thursday that taking responsibility for his actions so many years later has been a “spiritual experience” and is necessary to move forward with his life.

“There’s only one way through this and that’s to hold myself accountable for this,” Flores said.

Flores made a surprise confession in September while he was in jail on an unrelated warrant. He detailed numerous occasions in the late 1990s when he assaulted his former girlfriend’s 2-year-old daughter. He reported sexually abusing the girl. He also broke the toddler’s collarbone.

The detective asked Flores why he was confessing. His response made little sense.

“I think that I’m such a (expletive) piece of (expletive) that no matter how much evidence they gather I can probably get off on that crime,” Flores said. “So, I want to make sure (the victim) gets justice.”

Last month, he pleaded guilty to first-degree child molestation.

Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Janice Ellis on Thursday sentenced the defendant to six years in prison. That’s 10 months shy of the maximum allowed under state sentencing guidelines.

Ellis gave Flores some credit for bringing the crime to the attention of police. He likely wouldn’t have faced criminal prosecution if he hadn’t initiated the confession, Ellis said.

The judge also called what Flores did “monstrous.”

Since his confession, the victim, now 18, has been forced to relive the abuse.

The criminal investigation has “stirred difficult and painful memories for her,” Snohomish County deputy prosecutor Jarett Goodkin told the judge.

The woman didn’t attend Thursday’s court hearing.

She told detectives that she remembered Flores hurting her. She recalled Flores throwing her against a wall. She also had memories of Flores inappropriately touching her when she was a child between the ages of two and three. She remembered feeling uncomfortable and fearful. She also recalled being in pain.

The girl’s mother told police that Flores, who was her live-in boyfriend, baby-sat her daughter while she was attending college in the late 1990s. She remembered the girl being hospitalized for a broken collarbone and pneumonia.

She said Flores was baby-sitting the girl when the child was injured. He never explained the broken bone, and she was too afraid to ask. The woman told investigators that Flores repeatedly beat her. She said she believed that she was the only person he was abusing. She described him as extremely violent and told detectives that during one “bender,” Flores killed the couple’s pets, including a lizard, kittens and a rabbit.

Once he’s released from prison, Flores must register as a sex offender. He is prohibited from having any contact with minors.

Diana Hefley: 425-339-3463; hefley@heraldnet.com.

Where to call

For more information about the signs of child abuse or how to report it, contact Dawson Place Child Advocacy Center at 425-388-7497 or go to www.dawsonplace.org.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Analisa Paterno of Marysville-Getchell, left, shares a laugh with Nathan Harms Friday morning at Pathfinder Manufacturing in Everett, Washington on September 23, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Sky’s the limit: Snohomish County teens help build parts for Boeing

Pathfinder Manufacturing in Everett trains dozens of at-risk high school students to make airplane parts, en route to a career.

Fred Safstrom, CEO of Housing Hope, is retiring. Photographed in Everett, Washington on October 5, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Housing Hope CEO reflects on 25-year career helping unsheltered people

“People used to believe homelessness was caused by bad choices.” Minds and policies are changing, Fred Safstrom said.

Vehicles exiting I-5 southbound begin to turn left into the eastbound lanes of 164th Street Southwest on Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2022, in Lynnwood, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Traffic backups on 164th Street near I-5 could see relief soon

The county and state are implementing a new traffic signal system that synchronizes the corridor and adjusts to demand.

Rick Winter (left) and Gary Yang, the founders of the former UniEnergy Technologies, stand with one their latest batteries, the Reflex, August 10, 2022. (Dan DeLong/InvestigateWest)
‘Chaotic mess’: Clean energy promises imploded at Mukilteo battery maker

UniEnergy Technologies absorbed millions in public funds, then suddenly went dark. The company is accused of providing tech to China.

Everett
Federal funds could pay for Everett bathrooms, gun buyback, more

City officials propose $7.95 million of American Rescue Plan Act money on a shelter, mental health support and more.

Community Transit chief financial officer Eunjoo Greenhouse
Community Transit hires King County staffer as CFO

Eunjoo Greenhouse is set to join the agency Oct. 24 after years in King County government.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Highway 9 in south Lake Stevens to close overnight this weekend

The highway will be closed between 20th Street SE and 32nd Street SE. Through traffic should use Highway 204 and U.S. 2.

Everett
Everett aims to ‘streamline’ cumbersome process for code violations

The current system costs about $1 million per year to run, but only brings in about $50,000 in fines. Staff suggested changes.

Alexander Fritz is released from handcuffs after being lead into the courtroom Thursday afternoon at Snohomish County Courthouse in Everett, Washington on October 6, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Team USA climbing coach gets 5 years for child rapes

Alexander Fritz, 28, engaged in “inappropriate relationships” with 15-year-old girls, he admitted in Snohomish County Superior Court.

Most Read