Monroe High senior Gio Fregoso wants to use his football experience for the greater good. “I want to set better examples. I try to help out whenever I can. I really want to help out the younger kids. We should be the ones setting that example so I try to do that.” (Olivia Vanni / The Herald).

Monroe High senior Gio Fregoso wants to use his football experience for the greater good. “I want to set better examples. I try to help out whenever I can. I really want to help out the younger kids. We should be the ones setting that example so I try to do that.” (Olivia Vanni / The Herald).

Monroe High quarterback wants to lead on and off the field

As Gio Fregoso’s senior year winds down, the Bearcat wants to be a role model for younger students.

MONROE — Gio Fregoso has been the starting quarterback at Monroe High School for the last two seasons.

As a captain, one of his other jobs is setting an example for his teammates.

The 18-year-old said that extends beyond the football field. He wants to be known as a friendly face and helping hand for every student at Monroe High.

Question: How did you get started playing football?

Answer: I was in soccer almost my whole life. I started football in eighth grade and just fell in love with it. I quit every other sport I was doing. I didn’t get to start at quarterback until my junior year so I was just running around playing different positions, seeing wherever the team needed me because that’s what I like doing. I like being there for the team.

Q: What was it about football that drew you to it?

A: What I got out of football was a sense of family. Our team was such a diverse team. We have a strong bond that felt like no one could faze us. It was us against the world the whole time and that’s what I loved about it.

Q: You were also a member of the Future Latino Leaders club. What was that like?

A: It’s a club I did a while back that was really about things we could do to make our community better. Being a Mexican-American obviously isn’t the easiest thing. I’m glad I did it. It really taught me a lot and opened my eyes to a whole new horizon.

Q: What else do you do around the school?

A: I’ve done Link Crew. It’s a club we have here where you help out freshmen. I wanted to be a part of it because I remember my freshman year Link Crew didn’t make me feel as welcome as I wanted to. So, I wanted to make sure freshmen felt as welcomed as they should here at school.

Q: Do you feel that being the starting quarterback puts you in a leadership position for the entire school?

A: I want to set better examples. I try to help out whenever I can. I really want to help out the younger kids. We should be the ones setting that example so I try to do that.

Q: Were there any times where being a leader was challenging?

A: We had a couple of scuffles this year. Me and one of the other captains were always the first ones to get in the middle and remind everyone that we’re doing this because we’re a brotherhood.

Q: What’s in store for you next year?

A: I’m weighing out my options. I want to see if an opportunity comes to play football. If not, I want to attend either Eastern Washington University or Washington State and get my degree in either sports management or psychology. My brother studied psychology in college. I want to be able to take the knowledge from that degree and apply it later on in life.

Q: Did you have anyone setting that example for you?

A: Definitely a guy named Zach Zimmerman. He was the quarterback when I was a freshmen. I looked up to him as a role model and saw how he was setting the example and helping rebuild the program. He took me under his wing and helped me so much so I want to be able to do the same with any freshmen at our school.

Q: Was there a time when your spot on the team was challenged?

A: Junior year I was in a quarterback battle. I had to fight for my spot. There were some really tough times. Some days (the other player) would have the upper hand, or for even weeks. Then it would switch to me. It was a back-and-forth battle so I had to keep a level head.

Q: Now that the season’s over, what are you up to?

A: Right now I’m just coming to school every day. I like being here. Monroe is my home. I’m trying to keep on top of my studies and continue to set that example.

Joey Thompson: 425-339-3449; jthompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @byjoeythompson.

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