Restoration work has been under way at a large wetland in Monroe. The Snohomish Conservation District is soliciting names for it. (Snohomish Conservation District)

Restoration work has been under way at a large wetland in Monroe. The Snohomish Conservation District is soliciting names for it. (Snohomish Conservation District)

Monroe wetland needs a name, but maybe not from ‘Fortnite’

A group of local folks will whittle down the submitted suggestions, which include “Moisty Mire.”

MONROE — It needs a better name than “where you see the pink flags.”

For years, restoration work has been under way at a large wetland in Monroe, between Roosevelt Road and the Evergreen State Fairgrounds, including 14,000 tree plantings.

Local children, ages 9 to 14, are invited to submit names for the wetland until April 9.

As of Tuesday morning, more than 160 suggestions had come in, said Lily Cason, a youth education coordinator with the Snohomish Conservation District.

“We are hoping naming it will connect people to it and also draw attention to the wetland and the importance of the wetlands,” she said.

Some of the ideas are touching, such as names in memory of loved ones who have passed.

At least two creeks flow into the wetland, and French Creek flows out of it. (Snohomish Conservation District)

At least two creeks flow into the wetland, and French Creek flows out of it. (Snohomish Conservation District)

There also were quite a few references to “Fortnite,” the hugely popular online video game.

“Apparently there is a wetland in ‘Fortnite’ that was destroyed, so that wetland was named the Moisty Mire, so we’ve had quite a lot of submissions proposing we name it the Moisty Mire,” Cason said.

The contest has been part of the conservation district’s education efforts in Monroe schools, touching on topics such as wetlands, ecosystems and future career paths. Several teachers have created lessons that complement that mission, Cason said.

A group of local folks will whittle down the names to a handful of finalists that will go before the city parks board. A decision is expected before the end of the school year.

The as-of-yet nameless wetland provides habitat for wildlife such as this Pacific Lamprey. (Snohomish Conservation District)

The as-of-yet nameless wetland provides habitat for wildlife such as this Pacific Lamprey. (Snohomish Conservation District)

At least two creeks flow into the wetland, and French Creek flows out of it. The area is home to pink salmon, coho salmon, bull trout and steelhead.

The new trees will provide shade, cooling down the water while the roots stabilize the soil. The city owns the land, which covers roughly 30 acres.

The restoration is funded through a grant from the state Department of Ecology. The planting crews have included the Washington Conservation Corps and the Veteran Conservation Corps.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @rikkiking.

Give it a try

Monroe-area children, ages 9 to 14, are invited to submit names for the wetland.

The Snohomish Conservation District says,Friends have names, so we think wetlands should, too. After all, they are like the kidneys of our environment, playing a vital role by filtering pollutants out of water and reducing flooding while providing habitat for birds and wildlife.”

Applicants are welcome to include original artwork as well.

More info: Visit snocd.org/wetland or contact Lily Cason at 425-377-7023, lcason@snohomishcd.org.

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