No charges filed in hit-and-run death of Index man

INDEX — Prosecutors have declined to file charges in the Aug. 4, 2012, hit-and-run accident that took the life of Stacey Broyles, 47, of Index.

There was insufficient evidence to prove to a jury beyond a doubt that the driver knew she’d struck a human being, a requirement for a conviction under state law, Snohomish County deputy prosecutor Tobin Darrow said.

The driver, 49, of Everett, left the scene. She met with detectives nine days later. She’d maintained that she thought she’d hit a dog.

Broyles’ dog, Charlie, was struck and died from injuries suffered in the collision.

Broyles’ parents traveled to Everett last week to meet with prosecutors.

A forensic analysis of the damage to the vehicle showed Broyles was lying in the road when he was hit, Darrow said. Broyles was heavily intoxicated at the time. It was dark outside.

The driver has no serious criminal history. It’s still not clear if Broyles had tripped or had fallen, or why he was in the road, Darrow said.

“I don’t think we’ll ever know precisely how that occurred,” he said.

Broyles struggled in life, but he always was loved, said his mother, Patti Libby. His family still mourns the loss.

Broyles was a free spirit, Libby said. He loved the outdoors, and he loved Index.

He was the goofy, silly one at family reunions. He drank, but even then, he was soft-hearted, she said.

“He had parents, and he was a good person, and he had a 22-year-old son,” she said. “He had siblings, and he did good in the community.”

Broyles loved his dog, who was like his shadow, she said. For awhile, he was married to a woman who worked at the Reptile Zoo in Monroe.

“He built aquariums and cages for the critters, and they took sick ones home and nursed them, and he was quite the animal lover – lots of them,” she said.

Broyles grew up in the Spokane area, one of five children in the family. He ran track in high school and community college.

He lived with his girlfriend, Marsha Motsenbocker, in a motor home, just up the road from where he died. He was walking home from the Index Arts Festival the night of his death.

He loved his girlfriend. He loved the Skykomish River. His memorial was held on its banks.

A second family memorial was held on the Pend Oreille River, near the family’s vacation home where Broyles spent many a weekend and summer. An 18-foot maple tree was planted at the property in his memory last fall. An old pair of his shoes sits underneath, alongside a granite plaque.

Broyles was a talented carpenter, his mother said. He worked for a time installing windows with his brother. He worked at a custom cabinetry shop. He worked in manufacturing.

“He was always doing somebody’s porch or roof, to help people, to make a few dollars,” Libby said. “He was just a kind person. He didn’t deserve to die like that.”

Sometime before Broyles died, his friend and local artist, Dean Shepard, made an oil painting of him and Charlie. After the death, Shepard gave the painting to Broyles’ girlfriend. She shared copies with the family.

“That’s the picture we used in his memorial service and that we all have on our desks,” Libby said.

Broyles also is survived by his son, Joby Broyles.

Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com

Talk to us

More in Local News

Staff are evaluating two more light rail alternatives for the Everett Link extension. One would follow Interstate 5 north of 128th Street SW to the Everett Mall and back to the freeway. Another would go west of 128th Street SW to Highway 99 and north to Casino Road. (Sound Transit)
Snohomish County leaders reject light rail routes bypassing Paine Field

Those options weren’t what voters approved — and would be like “butchering” the plan, the Snohomish County executive said.

A Sound Transit train arrives at Westlake Station in downtown Seattle. (Sue Misao / Herald file) May 2019
Should light rail skip Paine Field and Boeing? We asked, you answered

More than 300 Herald readers responded to an online poll. Here are the results.

Councilmember Megan Dunn, left, stands next to County Executive Dave Somers as he presents his 2023 budget proposal to her, Councilmember Nate Nehring and Councilmember Sam Low. (Snohomish County)
As County Council begins budget talks, here’s how you can weigh in.

Department heads will make their pitches in the next few days. Residents will get a say at a forum and two hearings this month

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Highway 9 work could disrupt travel through Lake Stevens

Construction is set for roundabouts on South Lake Stevens Road and one at North Davies Road and Vernon Road.

Lynnwood City Council members, from left: Jim Smith, Shirley Sutton, Shannon Sessions, Josh Binda, George Hurst, Julieta Altamirano-Crosby, and Patrick Decker. (City of Lynnwood)
No penalty for Lynnwood council member’s ‘underinformed’ views on racism

The City Council didn’t censure Jim Smith after a report found he discriminated against a Black city employee.

All ears: Mukilteo couple provides surgery for kids born without ears

Dr. Prabhat and Trish Bhama are part of a HUGS volunteer team providing treatment for microtia in Guatemala.

Everett
Everett gets state Auditor’s Office stewardship award

State Auditor Pat McCarthy presented the award during the most recent Everett City Council meeting.

Representative Rick Larsen speaks at the March For Our Lives rally on Saturday, June 11, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Larsen to hold community meeting in Everett on Monday

The veteran Democratic lawmaker will address recent legislation passed by Congress and other topics.

Tribal members dance to start an assemble on the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation and Orange Shirt Day Friday evening at Tulalip Gathering Hall in Tulalip, Washington on September 30, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
‘Still here’: Tulalip boarding school descendants celebrate resilience

On Orange Shirt Day, a national day of remembrance, the Tulalip Tribes honored those who suffered due to violent cultural suppression.

Most Read